Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Aberrant Oxidation of Biomolecules".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020) | Viewed by 29882

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
The Department of Applied Animal Science, College of Animal Life Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, Republic of Korea
Interests: meat quality; antioxidant activity; animal production; meat science and technology; bioactivity; poultry science; food chemistry; egg production; food analysis; antioxidants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meat is a very complex matrix and contains various compounds that can influence its bioactive properties, such as antioxidation, which can be altered by various factors. Feeding various diet to livestock effect on antioxidative properties of meat and results in change of fatty acid composition, pigment, sensory characteristics, and freshness of meat. Some specific antioxidative compounds can be used to enhance the shelf-life of meat via inhibition of protein or lipid oxidation.

Aging and fermentation can also alter the antioxidative characteristics of meat and meat products. It is considered that during these processes, various antioxidative compounds and peptides can be induced by endogenous enzymes, food enzymes, and microbes. Therefore, the identification and purification of antioxidative peptides and other compounds using HPLC, LC/MS/MS, and MALDI-TOF, as well as, elucidating the potential interaction between the antioxidants and meat quality would be important for enhancing meat quality and shelf life.

This Special Issue aims to focus on the topic of improving the oxidative stability of meat during storage and processing. Also, hope to cover studies on the separation and identification of antioxidative compounds, such as peptides and macro- or micro-molecules in meat, and the evaluation of bioactivity of meat and meat products via in vivo/in vitro experiments. 

Prof. Dr. Aera Jang
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • bioactive compounds
  • meat extracts
  • protein and lipid oxidation
  • antioxidative peptides
  • oxidative stability

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Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 290 KiB  
Article
Effect of Dietary Grape Pomace on Fattening Rabbit Performance, Fatty Acid Composition, and Shelf Life of Meat
by Mohamed D. Bouzaida, Virginia C. Resconi, David Gimeno, Jakeline V. Romero, Juan B. Calanche, Marta Barahona, José L. Olleta and Gustavo A. María
Antioxidants 2021, 10(5), 795; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10050795 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2818
Abstract
The use of agroindustry by-products in animal diets allows the use of residues that are not fit for human consumption. In this study, it was investigated whether fattening commercial rabbits during 30 days with a non-medicated feed, with 20% addition of grape pomace [...] Read more.
The use of agroindustry by-products in animal diets allows the use of residues that are not fit for human consumption. In this study, it was investigated whether fattening commercial rabbits during 30 days with a non-medicated feed, with 20% addition of grape pomace (GPD), affected production traits and the fatty acid composition, antioxidants properties, and the shelf life of the meat compared to a conventional strategy (CON). Furthermore, it was tested, by chromatographic analysis, whether this alternative diet allowed the transfer of phenolic compounds to the meat. Thirty-six weaned rabbits were allotted to the two treatments. In each treatment, 18 rabbits were fattened in three indoor cages, each housing three males and three female rabbits. No significant differences were found in live weights (p > 0.05), but the feed conversion rate and carcass weight and yield were found to be impaired in the GPD group (p ≤ 0.05). The GPD group had a higher intramuscular fat percentage (2.01 vs. 1.54), improved polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio (0.75 vs. 0.66), and better atherogenicity (0.71 vs. 0.83) and thrombogenicity (1.14 vs. 1.24) indexes, while the n-6/n-3 ratio was higher (25.4 vs. 20.3). Total volatile basic nitrogen in meat was lower in the GPD group (p = 0.01), suggesting a delayed spoilage. However, no improvements in total phenolic content, antioxidant capacity, reducing power, and lipid oxidation (p > 0.05) were found in the meat. Even though the GPD pellets offered to the animals had several grape-derived phenolic compounds, and higher antioxidant properties compared to the CON diet, none of the phenolic compounds detected in feeds were detected in the meat samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
12 pages, 1336 KiB  
Article
Fatty Acid Profile and Antioxidative Properties of Peptides Isolated from Fermented Lamb Loin Treated with Fermented Milk
by Małgorzata Karwowska, Anna D. Kononiuk, Dariusz M. Stasiak and Krzysztof Patkowski
Antioxidants 2020, 9(11), 1094; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9111094 - 7 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1941
Abstract
This study evaluated the impact of fermented milk maceration on fermented lamb loin without nitrate to obtain peptides with high activity against oxidative changes (ABTS, DPPH, reducing power) as well as a favorable fatty acid profile, including CLA content. Additionally, an attempt was [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the impact of fermented milk maceration on fermented lamb loin without nitrate to obtain peptides with high activity against oxidative changes (ABTS, DPPH, reducing power) as well as a favorable fatty acid profile, including CLA content. Additionally, an attempt was made to evaluate the influence of the lamb breed on the assessed properties. Raw loins (m. Longissimus dorsi) obtained from sheep of three polish breeds—Wrzosówka, Uhruska, and Świniarka—and fermented products were tested. The fermented loins obtained after 14 days of processing were characterized by pH and water activity values in the ranges, respectively, 4.76–5.12 and 0.902–0.915. The maceration of meat in a fermented milk has caused greater acidification of the meat during fermentation. Statistical analysis indicated that treatment was the factor with significant effect on peptide content; no effect of animal breed was found. The peptide content isolated from raw meat ranged from 2.90 to 4.31 mg g−1 of sample, while in fermented meat products it was significant higher (11.59–16.37 mg g−1 of product). The antioxidant properties of peptides were positively correlated with peptides content. The maceration in fermented milk resulted in a statistically significant increase of ABTS value in case of fermented lamb loin of Świniarka breed. The raw meat and fermented meat products form the Świniarka lamb breed were characterized by the highest content of the total CLA isomers. The main CLA isomer found was cis9-trans11 (rumenic acid), followed by cis9-cis11, trans9-trans11, and trans10-cis12. The rumenic acid content was higher than, respectively, 87% and 80–88% of total CLA isomers in case of raw meat and fermented lamb loins of three breeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
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14 pages, 304 KiB  
Article
Antioxidative Characteristics of Chicken Breast Meat and Blood after Diet Supplementation with Carnosine, L-histidine, and β-alanine
by Wieslaw Kopec, Dorota Jamroz, Andrzej Wiliczkiewicz, Ewa Biazik, Anna Pudlo, Malgorzata Korzeniowska, Tomasz Hikawczuk and Teresa Skiba
Antioxidants 2020, 9(11), 1093; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9111093 - 7 Nov 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3607
Abstract
The objective of the study was to test the effect of diets supplemented with β-alanine, L-histidine, and carnosine on the histidine dipeptide content and the antioxidative status of chicken breast muscles and blood. One-day-old Hubbard Flex male chickens were assigned to five treatments: [...] Read more.
The objective of the study was to test the effect of diets supplemented with β-alanine, L-histidine, and carnosine on the histidine dipeptide content and the antioxidative status of chicken breast muscles and blood. One-day-old Hubbard Flex male chickens were assigned to five treatments: control diet (C) and control diet supplemented with 0.18% L-histidine (ExpH), 0.3% β-alanine (ExpA), a mix of L-histidine\β-alanine (ExpH+A), and 0.27% carnosine (ExpCar). After 28 days, chicken breast muscles and blood samples were analyzed for the antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD)), carnosine and anserine content, amino acid profile, and anti-radical activity (ABTS, DPPH, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)). The results of the study showed that carnosine supplementation effectively increased body weight and breast muscle share in chicken carcasses. Carnosine and L-histidine supplementation with or without β-alanine increased carnosine content in chicken breast muscles up to 20% (p = 0.003), but the boost seems to be too low to affect the potential antioxidant capacity and amino acid content. The β-alanine-enriched diet lowered dipeptide concentration in chicken blood serum (p = 0.002) and activated catalase in chicken breast muscles in relation to the control group (p = 0.003). It can be concluded that histidine or dipeptide supplementation of chicken diets differently affected the total antioxidant potential: in breast muscles, it increased dipeptide content, while in blood cell sediment (rich in erythrocytes), increased SOD and GPx activities were observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
23 pages, 1325 KiB  
Article
A Chemometric Approach to Oxidative Stability and Physicochemical Quality of Raw Ground Chicken Meat Affected by Black Seed and Other Spice Extracts
by Małgorzata Muzolf-Panek, Anna Kaczmarek, Jolanta Tomaszewska-Gras, Renata Cegielska-Radziejewska, Tomasz Szablewski, Małgorzata Majcher and Kinga Stuper-Szablewska
Antioxidants 2020, 9(9), 903; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090903 - 22 Sep 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3451
Abstract
The effects of black seed (Nigella sativa), allspice, bay leaf, caraway, cardamom, clove, and nutmeg extracts on the quality of raw ground chicken legs stored at 4 °C were investigated. During 12 days of storage, conjugated diene (CD) content, thiobarbituric acid [...] Read more.
The effects of black seed (Nigella sativa), allspice, bay leaf, caraway, cardamom, clove, and nutmeg extracts on the quality of raw ground chicken legs stored at 4 °C were investigated. During 12 days of storage, conjugated diene (CD) content, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidation induction time (IP) by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), hexanal content by GC-SPME-MS, thiol group (SH) content were determined. Moreover, microbial growth, pH and color of the samples were investigated. Sensory analysis was also realized. All extracts increased oxidative stability and safety of meat, significantly changed the color of the samples, stabilized the pH and increased their sensory scores (except color of samples with bay leaf and black seed) when comparing to control. Black seed, allspice and clove extracts showed high antioxidant capacity in lipid (CD = 0.23%, 0.28%, and 0.37%, respectively; TBARS = 0.55, 0.50, and 0.48 mg/kg, respectively) and protein fraction (SH content = 47.9, 52.1 and 52.7 nmol/g, respectively), although the ABTS•+ radical scavenging activity of black seed (33.1 µM/g) was significantly lower than the cloves (2496 µM/g) and allspice (815 µM/g). In the sensory analysis the highest scores were ascribed to the sample with cardamom followed by cloves. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated complex and inseparable interrelationship among lipid and protein oxidation processes and the relationship of the protein oxidation on the lightness of meat. The results enabled to discriminate the meat samples, showing a great impact of the extracts on the final quality of raw chicken meat with black seed being potent antioxidant active additive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
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18 pages, 4028 KiB  
Article
Effect of Adding Curcumin on the Properties of Linseed Oil Organogels Used as Fat Replacers in Pâtés
by Patricia Ramírez-Carrasco, Javier Paredes-Toledo, Patricio Romero-Hasler, Eduardo Soto-Bustamante, Paulo Díaz-Calderón, Paz Robert and Begoña Giménez
Antioxidants 2020, 9(8), 735; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9080735 - 11 Aug 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3448
Abstract
Beeswax-based organogels were formulated with linseed oil and curcumin according to a statistical design to increase the oxidative stability of spreadable meat products (pâté) where these organogels (OGCur) were incorporated as fat substitutes. The organogels obtained under optimal conditions (9.12% beeswax, 0.54% curcumin) [...] Read more.
Beeswax-based organogels were formulated with linseed oil and curcumin according to a statistical design to increase the oxidative stability of spreadable meat products (pâté) where these organogels (OGCur) were incorporated as fat substitutes. The organogels obtained under optimal conditions (9.12% beeswax, 0.54% curcumin) showed a mechanical strength similar to pork backfat determined by back extrusion and high oil binding capacity (OBC; over 90%). The incorporation of curcumin at this concentration did not lead to any change in the arrangement of the crystal network, OBC, and mechanical, thermal, or rheological properties of the organogels. Beeswax organogels with and without curcumin, with a β’ orthorhombic subcell structure, showed a predominant elastic behavior and a melting event wider and shifted to lower temperatures than pure beeswax, suggesting a plasticizer effect of the oil in the wax crystals. The oxidative stability of the organogels under accelerated oxidation conditions increased due to the incorporation of curcumin. A decrease in the curcumin content was found from day 4 at 60 °C, together with a significantly lower formation of both peroxides and malonaldehyde. When pork backfat was partially or totally replaced by OGCur in pâtés, a noticeable protective effect of curcumin against lipid oxidation was found during chilled storage Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
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17 pages, 2602 KiB  
Article
Effect of Wine Lees as Alternative Antioxidants on Physicochemical and Sensorial Composition of Deer Burgers Stored during Chilled Storage
by Marina Alarcón, Manuel López-Viñas, María Soledad Pérez-Coello, María Consuelo Díaz-Maroto, María Elena Alañón and Almudena Soriano
Antioxidants 2020, 9(8), 687; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9080687 - 2 Aug 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3159
Abstract
Wine lees from two grape varieties (Vitis vinifera L. Cv. “verdejo” and “palomino”) were studied as natural preservatives in deer burgers compared with the traditional additive sodium ascorbate. Burgers packed in modified atmosphere packaging and stored in refrigeration were analyzed at 0, [...] Read more.
Wine lees from two grape varieties (Vitis vinifera L. Cv. “verdejo” and “palomino”) were studied as natural preservatives in deer burgers compared with the traditional additive sodium ascorbate. Burgers packed in modified atmosphere packaging and stored in refrigeration were analyzed at 0, 4, 8, and 12 days. The addition of lees (2.5% and 5%) produced a reduction of pH and variations in color (L* and a*), higher antioxidant capacity and phenolic content, lower lipid and protein oxidation, and the inhibition of psychotrophic aerobic bacteria and enterobacteria during the storage time. Likewise, burgers with lees kept the aldehydes concentration (volatile compounds indicators of lipid oxidation) over storage time, while esters, acids, and other compounds, previously present in lees, increased. These changes provided new odor and taste attributes like wine, bakery, and raisin notes. Therefore, the addition of wine lees had an antioxidant and antimicrobial effect and produced new sensory attributes in deer burgers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
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19 pages, 1363 KiB  
Article
Influence of Reheating Methods and Frozen Storage on Physicochemical Characteristics and Warmed-Over Flavor of Nutmeg Extract-Enriched Precooked Beef Meatballs
by Rashida Parvin, Md. Ashrafuzzaman Zahid, Jin-Kyu Seo, Junyoung Park, Jonghyun Ko and Han-Sul Yang
Antioxidants 2020, 9(8), 670; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9080670 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 4526
Abstract
The effects of convection-oven precooking, frozen storage (−18 °C/ two months) and four different reheating methods—namely, boiling, pan-roasting, convection oven and microwave oven on pH, color, texture, antioxidant activity and warmed-over flavor of beef meatballs were investigated. In this study, four kinds of [...] Read more.
The effects of convection-oven precooking, frozen storage (−18 °C/ two months) and four different reheating methods—namely, boiling, pan-roasting, convection oven and microwave oven on pH, color, texture, antioxidant activity and warmed-over flavor of beef meatballs were investigated. In this study, four kinds of beef meatballs were prepared: with added butylated hydroxyl toluene (0.02% BHT, M1); with nutmeg extract (0.02%, M2); with nutmeg powder (0.02%, M3) and control (no antioxidant). Addition of (0.02%) nutmeg extracts in beef meatballs M2 resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in lipid and protein oxidation, hardness and gumminess values after convection oven precooking. Again, M2 reheated by microwave oven significantly (p < 0.05) reduced cooking loss, gumminess, springiness, rancid flavor, saltiness and burnt taste and increased oxidative stability, redness and adhesiveness with the chewiness intensity and overall acceptability compared to control, M1 and M3. Conclusively, the addition of nutmeg extracts (0.02%) as a natural plant antioxidant to precooked beef meatballs can result in reduced lipid and protein oxidation levels, stabilized color and texture values and improved overall acceptance after reheated by microwave oven during two months of frozen storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
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Review

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22 pages, 795 KiB  
Review
Natural Antioxidants from Seeds and Their Application in Meat Products
by Paulo E. S. Munekata, Beatriz Gullón, Mirian Pateiro, Igor Tomasevic, Ruben Domínguez and José M. Lorenzo
Antioxidants 2020, 9(9), 815; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090815 - 1 Sep 2020
Cited by 44 | Viewed by 6106
Abstract
The use of synthetic antioxidants in the food industry has raised important questions about the effects of prolonged consumption on human health. On top of that, the consumption of meat products has been changing due to the awareness generated by health-related organizations. In [...] Read more.
The use of synthetic antioxidants in the food industry has raised important questions about the effects of prolonged consumption on human health. On top of that, the consumption of meat products has been changing due to the awareness generated by health-related organizations. In this sense, exploring strategies to develop and produce healthier meat products has become a paramount concern. Several studies explored the composition of several seeds to characterize and explore the compounds with antioxidant activity, which are mainly composed of polyphenols. The use of antioxidant extracts in meat products has shown important results to delay the oxidative reactions in meat products derived from the processing and storage of meat products. Moreover, these extracts can also replace synthetic antioxidants and preserve the quality of meat products. Therefore, the aims of this review are first, to present the sources and compounds with antioxidant activity in seeds, and second, to discuss their protective effect against oxidative reactions in meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidative Properties in Meat and Meat Products)
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