Special Issue "Social Dimensions of Antibiotic Resistance in Asia - a One Health Perspective"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sonia Lewycka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for International Health and Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Interests: antibiotic resistance; vaccine-preventable diseases; maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health; complex interventions; behaviour change; public health
Dr. Christopher Pell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: the acceptability of novel influenza vaccine technologies; implementation of novel antibiotic resistance surveillance for humans and livestock; decentralizing diabetes and hypertension care in Eswatini; implementing a critical registry in South and South East Asia
Prof. Dr. Phaik Yeong Cheah
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
2. Centre for Tropical Medicine & Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Interests: bioethics; community engagement; public engagement; antimicrobial resistance; AMR

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antibiotic resistance is a global public health concern, and a particular threat in Asia, where the burden of infectious disease remains high, and antibiotic access and use has increased dramatically. The largest volume of antibiotics is used in agriculture, with little monitoring or regulation. In the human domain, antibiotics are often provided without health providers following diagnostic guidelines; they are also sold widely over-the-counter, and taken in inappropriate doses. These practices are entwined with the social, cultural and economic context in which they are found. They also have clear implications for the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. Understanding the social dimensions of these practices is crucial to designing effective interventions to mitigate the threat of antibiotic resistance.

With a view to learning lessons for interventions, this Special Issue will explore the social dimensions of antibiotic resistance in Asia, taking a One Health perspective, looking at antibiotic use in different sectors as well as across whole systems.

Dr. Sonia Lewycka
Dr. Christopher Pell
Prof. Dr. Phaik Yeong Cheah
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibiotic use
  • antibiotic resistance
  • One Health
  • prescribing
  • agriculture
  • Asia
  • social
  • cultural
  • economic
  • drivers
  • behaviour
  • interventions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Understanding Antibiotic Usage on Small-Scale Dairy Farms in the Indian States of Assam and Haryana Using a Mixed-Methods Approach—Outcomes and Challenges
Antibiotics 2021, 10(9), 1124; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10091124 - 18 Sep 2021
Viewed by 1032
Abstract
The use and misuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals contributes to the global emergence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) bacteria, a threat to public health and infection control. Currently, India is the world’s leading milk producer but antibiotic usage within the dairy [...] Read more.
The use and misuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals contributes to the global emergence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) bacteria, a threat to public health and infection control. Currently, India is the world’s leading milk producer but antibiotic usage within the dairy sector is poorly regulated. Little data exists reflecting how antibiotics are used on dairy farms, especially on small-scale dairy farms in India. To address this lack of data, a study was carried out on 491 small-scale dairy farms in two Indian states, Assam and Haryana, using a mixed method approach where farmers were interviewed, farms inspected for the presence of antibiotics and milk samples taken to determine antibiotic usage. Usage of antibiotics on farms appeared low only 10% (95% CI 8–13%) of farmers surveyed confirmed using antibiotics in their dairy herds during the last 12 months. Of the farms surveyed, only 8% (6–11%) had milk samples positive for antibiotic residues, namely from the novobiocin, macrolides, and sulphonamide classes of antibiotics. Of the farmers surveyed, only 2% (0.8–3%) had heard of the term “withdrawal period” and 53% (40–65%) failed to describe the term “antibiotic”. While this study clearly highlights a lack of understanding of antibiotics among small-scale dairy farmers, a potential factor in the emergence of AMR bacteria, it also shows that antibiotic usage on these farms is low and that the possible role these farmers play in AMR emergence may be overestimated. Full article
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