Epidemiology and Mechanism of Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2024) | Viewed by 3129

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
2. Parasitic Disease Department, Colentina Clinical Hospital, 020125 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: infectious diseases; microbiology; antimicrobial resistance; virulence
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail
Guest Editor
1. Department of Microbiology II, Faculty of Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
2. Cantacuzino National Military Medical Institute for Research and Development, 050096 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: infectious diseases; microbiology; chronic infections; bacteriophage; microcalorimetry; tuberculosis; blood-borne pathogens
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antibiotics still play an important role in global public health, especially in the case of infectious disease emergencies. However, the overuse of antibiotics and the decline in infection prevention and measures have accelerated the emergence and dissemination of multi- (MDR), extended- (XDR) and even pan-drug (PDR)-resistant clones. In addition, bacteria acquire drug resistance genes from other resistant bacteria in the environment through horizontal gene transfer mediated by mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, leading to the changes in the environmental resistome with the occurrence of complex resistance and even MDR phenotypes in the extraclinical sectors. In recent decades, the researchers focused not only on the clinical but also on the environmental drug-resistant strains. By utilizing phenotypic and genomic techniques, it is essential to understand the epidemiology of multi-drug-resistant bacteria isolated from human and environmental microbiomes as well as for the development of new and faster diagnostic tools.

In this Special Issue, we welcome papers of phenotypic and molecular epidemiology, diagnostic methods and antibiotic sensitivity with innovative phenotypic and molecular approaches. Submissions addressing the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Gabriela Loredana Popa
Prof. Dr. Mircea Ioan Popa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multi-drug resistant (MDR)
  • classic and molecular epidemiology
  • plasmids
  • resistance gene

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

27 pages, 796 KiB  
Review
The Importance of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacterales in African Countries: Evolution and Current Burden
by Edgar-Costin Chelaru, Andrei-Alexandru Muntean, Mihai-Octav Hogea, Mădălina-Maria Muntean, Mircea-Ioan Popa and Gabriela-Loredana Popa
Antibiotics 2024, 13(4), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13040295 - 24 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1173
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a worldwide healthcare problem. Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) can spread quickly owing to their resistance mechanisms. Although colonized individuals are crucial for MDRO dissemination, colonizing microbes can lead to symptomatic infections in carriers. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (CPE) are among the most [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a worldwide healthcare problem. Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) can spread quickly owing to their resistance mechanisms. Although colonized individuals are crucial for MDRO dissemination, colonizing microbes can lead to symptomatic infections in carriers. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (CPE) are among the most important MDROs involved in colonizations and infections with severe outcomes. This review aimed to track down the first reports of CPE in Africa, describe their dissemination throughout African countries and summarize the current status of CRE and CPE data, highlighting current knowledge and limitations of reported data. Two database queries were undertaken using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), employing relevant keywords to identify articles that had as their topics beta-lactamases, carbapenemases and carbapenem resistance pertaining to Africa or African regions and countries. The first information on CPE could be traced back to the mid-2000s, but data for many African countries were established after 2015–2018. Information is presented chronologically for each country. Although no clear conclusions could be drawn for some countries, it was observed that CPE infections and colonizations are present in most African countries and that carbapenem-resistance levels are rising. The most common CPE involved are Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, and the most prevalent carbapenemases are NDM-type and OXA-48-type enzymes. Prophylactic measures, such as screening, are required to combat this phenomenon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Mechanism of Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics)
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27 pages, 1503 KiB  
Review
Pan-Genome Plasticity and Virulence Factors: A Natural Treasure Trove for Acinetobacter baumannii
by Theodoros Karampatakis, Katerina Tsergouli and Payam Behzadi
Antibiotics 2024, 13(3), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13030257 - 14 Mar 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1545
Abstract
Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a variety of community- and hospital-acquired infections. It is recognized as a life-threatening pathogen among hospitalized individuals and, in particular, immunocompromised patients in many countries. A. baumannii, as a member of the ESKAPE group, encompasses [...] Read more.
Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a variety of community- and hospital-acquired infections. It is recognized as a life-threatening pathogen among hospitalized individuals and, in particular, immunocompromised patients in many countries. A. baumannii, as a member of the ESKAPE group, encompasses high genomic plasticity and simultaneously is predisposed to receive and exchange the mobile genetic elements (MGEs) through horizontal genetic transfer (HGT). Indeed, A. baumannii is a treasure trove that contains a high number of virulence factors. In accordance with these unique pathogenic characteristics of A. baumannii, the authors aim to discuss the natural treasure trove of pan-genome and virulence factors pertaining to this bacterial monster and try to highlight the reasons why this bacterium is a great concern in the global public health system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Mechanism of Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics)
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