Antimicrobial Resistance in Environmental Reservoirs of Pathogenic and Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2525

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1. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
2. Parasitic Disease Department, Colentina Clinical Hospital, 020125 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: infectious diseases; microbiology; antimicrobial resistance; virulence
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Department 2 - Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology, Microbiology, Parasitology, Virology, Diabetes, Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitatea de Medicina si Farmacie Carol Davila din Bucuresti, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: antimicrobial resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water bodies, an important component of the environment, aggregate antibiotic resistant bacteria, including ESKAPE pathogens, i.e., Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp., as well as antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), antibiotics, pharmacologically active compounds and other chemical pollutants (such as heavy metals, other classes of drugs, and their metabolites, preservatives, dyes). Although strict, environmentally focused, policies and their enforcement are expected to reduce the biological pollution burden; these interventions are applied inconsistently across the world. As waterways communicate, the environmental impact may have far-reaching consequences.

This Special Issue, “Environmental Reservoirs of Pathogenic and Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria”, seeks worldwide manuscript submissions to advance knowledge on the impact of human (clinical and non-clinical), animal (veterinary, food production, etc.), and industrial activity on the environmental reservoir of resistance and pathogenicity. A particular focus will be paid to the efficiency of different wastewater treatment, decontamination, and inactivation processes, in the removal of different contaminants.

We are inviting reviews and original articles, using different culture-based and culture-independent, multi-omics methodological approaches that could integrate in a multidisciplinary, multisectorial, one-health approach of antimicrobial resistance.

Prof. Dr. Gabriela Loredana Popa
Dr. Andrei Alexandru Muntean
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental antimicrobial resistance
  • pathogenic bacteria
  • wastewaters
  • wastewater treatment
  • pharmacologically active compounds
  • One Health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4529 KiB  
Article
Emergence of Carbapenemase Genes in Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from the Wastewater Treatment Plant in A Coruña, Spain
by Mohammed Nasser-Ali, Pablo Aja-Macaya, Kelly Conde-Pérez, Noelia Trigo-Tasende, Soraya Rumbo-Feal, Ana Fernández-González, Germán Bou, Margarita Poza and Juan A. Vallejo
Antibiotics 2024, 13(2), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13020194 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1096
Abstract
Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are recognized as important niches of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can be easily spread to the environment. In this study, we collected wastewater samples from the WWTP of A Coruña (NW Spain) from April 2020 to February 2022 to evaluate [...] Read more.
Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are recognized as important niches of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can be easily spread to the environment. In this study, we collected wastewater samples from the WWTP of A Coruña (NW Spain) from April 2020 to February 2022 to evaluate the presence of Gram-negative bacteria harboring carbapenemase genes. Bacteria isolated from wastewater were classified and their antimicrobial profiles were determined. In total, 252 Gram-negative bacteria carrying various carbapenemase genes were described. Whole-genome sequencing was conducted on 55 selected carbapenemase producing isolates using Oxford Nanopore technology. This study revealed the presence of a significant population of bacteria carrying carbapenemase genes in WWTP, which constitutes a public health problem due to their risk of dissemination to the environment. This emphasizes the usefulness of WWTP monitoring for combating antibiotic resistance. Data revealed the presence of different types of sequences harboring carbapenemase genes, such as blaKPC-2, blaGES-5, blaGES-6, blaIMP-11, blaIMP-28, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-48, blaOXA-58, blaOXA-217, and blaVIM-2. Importantly, the presence of the blaKPC-2 gene in wastewater, several months before any clinical case was detected in University Hospital of A Coruña, suggests that wastewater-based epidemiology can be used as an early warning system for the surveillance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Full article
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15 pages, 5435 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Preservatives on Antibiotic- and Preservative-Resistant Microbes and Nitrogen/Sulfur Cycle Associated Microbial Communities in Freshwater River Sediments
by Chien-Sen Liao, Xuan-Di Cao, Wei-Chen Lee and Chu-Wen Yang
Antibiotics 2023, 12(7), 1082; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12071082 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 953
Abstract
The intensive use of benzoic acid (BA), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HB), and dehydroacetate (DHA) as additives and preservatives in cosmetics and foods causes emerging environmental pollutions. Anthropogenic releases of BA, HB and DHA are primarily emissions into water and soil. However, few studies investigate [...] Read more.
The intensive use of benzoic acid (BA), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HB), and dehydroacetate (DHA) as additives and preservatives in cosmetics and foods causes emerging environmental pollutions. Anthropogenic releases of BA, HB and DHA are primarily emissions into water and soil. However, few studies investigate the effects of BA, HB and DHA on microbial communities in freshwater river sediments. The aim of this study is to reveal the effects of BA, HB and DHA on microbial communities in freshwater river sediments. Tetracycline-, sulfamethoxazole- and preservative-resistant microbes were increased in the river sediments treated with BA, HB and DHA. The relative abundances of methanogen- and xenobiotic-degradation-associated microbial communities were also increased in the BA-, HB- and DHA-treated sediments. The relative abundance of four nitrogen cycle associated microbial groups (anammox, nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction) were increased after the eighth week in the BA-, HB- and DHA-treated sediments. For the sulfur cycle, the relative abundance of thiosulfate oxidation associated microbial communities were increased after the eighth week in the BA-, HB- and DHA-treated sediments. Results of this study provide insight into the effects of BA, HB and DHA on antibiotic resistance, nitrogen cycle, sulfur cycle, drug resistance and methane production in freshwater aquatic environments. Full article
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