Stem-Cell-Based Therapies in Veterinary Medicine—Current Status and Perspectives

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2024 | Viewed by 9570

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Animal Science and Food Engineering, University of São Paulo, Pirassununga, São Paulo 13635-900, Brazil
Interests: stem cells; animal models; acquired and genetic diseases; placenta

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Animal Science and Food Engineering, University of São Paulo, Pirassununga, São Paulo 13635-900, Brazil
Interests: biobanking; stem cell lineages; animal models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last three decades, abundant information and data from different stem cell lineages in domestic and wild animals have been gathered in the literature. However, new sources of tissue and different types of cells from different species must be strongly described in future articles. Biobanking and new protocols of stem cell lineages are encouraged, as is the their use in animal models of diseases, both acquired and genetics.

We are pleased to invite researchers from around the world to submit your manuscripts on stem-cell-based therapies sharing possible new therapies using stem cell lines from different species in preclinical trials. Strong data from stem cells animal collections must be published to open new avenues of alternatives therapies.

Cell line biobanking may help to produce information for future use in conservative perspectives or even to treat reproduction problems and may guarantee cell lines for cloning purposes.

Another important aspect is the search for alternative therapies that will help to improve the quality of life of animals and their owners.

We invite researchers to submit your articles to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Eduardo Ambrósio
Dr. Daniele Santos Martins
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • stem cells
  • lineages
  • animal models
  • wild animals
  • domestic animals
  • biobanking

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 5897 KiB  
Article
Optimizing the Adipogenic Induction Protocol Using Rosiglitazone Improves the Physiological Parameters and Differentiation Capacity of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Horses, Sheep, Dogs, Murines, and Humans
by Manuela Heimann, Mohamed I. Elashry, Michele C. Klymiuk, Asmaa Eldaey, Sabine Wenisch and Stefan Arnhold
Animals 2023, 13(20), 3224; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13203224 - 15 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1196
Abstract
The investigation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) has received considerable interest in regenerative medicine. A nontoxic adipogenic induction protocol valid for cells of different mammalian species has not been described. This study aims to establish an adipogenic differentiation protocol suitable for [...] Read more.
The investigation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) has received considerable interest in regenerative medicine. A nontoxic adipogenic induction protocol valid for cells of different mammalian species has not been described. This study aims to establish an adipogenic differentiation protocol suitable for horses, sheep, dogs, murines, and human cells. An optimized rosiglitazone protocol, consisting of 5% fetal calf serum in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium, 10 μg/mL insulin, 0.55 μg/mL transferrin, 6.8 ng sodium selenite, 1 μM dexamethasone, and 1–5 μM of rosiglitazone, is compared to the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine (IBMX) protocol, where rosiglitazone was replaced with 0.5 mM IBMX and 0.2 mM indomethacin. Cell viability, cytotoxicity, a morphometric analysis of the lipid, and the expression of adipogenic markers for 14 days were assessed. The data revealed that using 5 µM of rosiglitazone promotes the adipogenic differentiation capacity in horse, sheep, and dog cells compared to IBMX induction. Meanwhile, marked reductions in the cell viability and cell number with the IBMX protocol were detected, and rosiglitazone increased the cell number and lipid droplet size, prevented apoptosis, and upregulated FABP-4 and Leptin expression in the cells of most of the species. Our data revealed that the rosiglitazone protocol improves the adipogenesis of ASCs, together with having less toxicity, and should be considered for cell reproducibility and clinical applications targeting obesity. Full article
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32 pages, 5287 KiB  
Article
Two Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem-Cells Injections to Osteoarthritic Elbows in Dogs—Pilot Study
by Michal Domaniza, Marian Hluchy, Dasa Cizkova, Filip Humenik, Lucia Slovinska, Nikola Hudakova, Lubica Hornakova, Juraj Vozar and Alexandra Trbolova
Animals 2023, 13(13), 2195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13132195 - 04 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1719
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of cell-based regenerative therapy for elbow joints affected by osteoarthritis. Interest was focused on two intra-articular applications of amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (A-MSCs) to a group of different breeds of dogs with elbow [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of cell-based regenerative therapy for elbow joints affected by osteoarthritis. Interest was focused on two intra-articular applications of amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (A-MSCs) to a group of different breeds of dogs with elbow osteoarthritis (13 joints). Two injections were performed 14 days apart. We evaluated synovial fluid biomarkers, such as IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-15, IL-10, MCP-1, TNF-α, and GM-CSF, by multiplex fluorescent micro-bead immunoassay in the treated group of elbows (n = 13) (day 0, day 14, and day 28) and in the control group of elbows (n = 9). Kinematic gait analysis determined the joint range of motion (ROM) before and after each A-MSCs application. Kinematic gait analysis was performed on day 0, day 14, and day 28. Kinematic gait analysis pointed out improvement in the average range of motion of elbow joints from day 0 (38.45 ± 5.74°), day 14 (41.7 ± 6.04°), and day 28 (44.78 ± 4.69°) with statistical significance (p < 0.05) in nine elbows. Correlation analyses proved statistical significance (p < 0.05) in associations between ROM (day 0, day 14, and day 28) and IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-15, MCP-1, TNF-α, and GM-CSF concentrations (day 0, day 14, and day 28). IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-15, MCP-1, GM-CSF, and TNF- α showed negative correlation with ROM at day 0, day 14, and day 28, while IL-10 demonstrated positive correlation with ROM. As a consequence of A-MSC application to the elbow joint, we detected a statistically significant (p < 0.05) decrease in concentration levels between day 0 and day 28 for IFN-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α and statistically significant increase for IL-10. Statistical significance (p < 0.05) was detected in TNF-α, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF concentrations between day 14 and the control group as well as at day 28 and the control group. IL-6 concentrations showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) between day 14 and the control group. Full article
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17 pages, 15427 KiB  
Article
Initial Characterization of 3D Culture of Yolk Sac Tissue
by Vitória Mattos Pereira, Priscila Avelino Ferreira Pinto, Lina Castelo Branco Motta, Matheus F. Almeida, André Furugen Cesar de Andrade, Ana Paula Pinoti Pavaneli and Carlos Eduardo Ambrósio
Animals 2023, 13(9), 1435; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13091435 - 22 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1941
Abstract
The role of the yolk sac (YS) in miscarriage is not yet clear, largely due to ethical reasons that make in vivo studies difficult to conduct. However, 3D cultures could provide a solution to this problem by enabling cells to be arranged in [...] Read more.
The role of the yolk sac (YS) in miscarriage is not yet clear, largely due to ethical reasons that make in vivo studies difficult to conduct. However, 3D cultures could provide a solution to this problem by enabling cells to be arranged in a way that more closely mimics the structure of the YS as it exists in vivo. In this study, three domestic species (porcine, canine, and bovine) were chosen as models to standardize 3D culture techniques for the YS. Two techniques of 3D culture were chosen: the Matrigel® and Hanging-Drop techniques, and the 2D culture technique was used as a standardized method. The formed structures were initially characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). In general, the 3D culture samples showed better organization of the YS cells compared to 2D cultures. The formed structures from both 3D methods assemble the mesothelial layer of YS tissue. Regarding the IHC assay, all in vitro models were able to express zinc and cholesterol transport markers, although only 3D culture techniques were able to generate structures with different markers pattern, indicating a cell differentiation process when compared to 2D cultures. Regarding mRNA expression, the 3D models had a greater gene expression pattern on the Hemoglobin subunit zeta-like (HBZ) gene related to the YS tissue, although no significant expression was found in Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating a lack of endodermal differentiation in our 3D model. With the initial technique and characterization established, the next step is to maintain the cultures and characterize the diversity of cell populations, stemness, functions, and genetic stability of each 3D in vitro model. Full article
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28 pages, 5393 KiB  
Article
Allogenic Synovia-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Equine Tendinopathies and Desmopathies—Proof of Concept
by Inês Leal Reis, Bruna Lopes, Patrícia Sousa, Ana Catarina Sousa, Mariana Branquinho, Ana Rita Caseiro, Sílvia Santos Pedrosa, Alexandra Rêma, Cláudia Oliveira, Beatriz Porto, Luís Atayde, Irina Amorim, Rui Alvites, Jorge Miguel Santos and Ana Colette Maurício
Animals 2023, 13(8), 1312; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13081312 - 11 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1913
Abstract
Tendon and ligament injuries are frequent in sport horses and humans, and such injuries represent a significant therapeutic challenge. Tissue regeneration and function recovery are the paramount goals of tendon and ligament lesion management. Nowadays, several regenerative treatments are being developed, based on [...] Read more.
Tendon and ligament injuries are frequent in sport horses and humans, and such injuries represent a significant therapeutic challenge. Tissue regeneration and function recovery are the paramount goals of tendon and ligament lesion management. Nowadays, several regenerative treatments are being developed, based on the use of stem cell and stem cell-based therapies. In the present study, the preparation of equine synovial membrane mesenchymal stem cells (eSM-MSCs) is described for clinical use, collection, transport, isolation, differentiation, characterization, and application. These cells are fibroblast-like and grow in clusters. They retain osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic differentiation potential. We present 16 clinical cases of tendonitis and desmitis, treated with allogenic eSM-MSCs and autologous serum, and we also include their evaluation, treatment, and follow-up. The concerns associated with the use of autologous serum as a vehicle are related to a reduced immunogenic response after the administration of this therapeutic combination, as well as the pro-regenerative effects from the growth factors and immunoglobulins that are part of its constitution. Most of the cases (14/16) healed in 30 days and presented good outcomes. Treatment of tendon and ligament lesions with a mixture of eSM-MSCs and autologous serum appears to be a promising clinical option for this category of lesions in equine patients. Full article
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Review

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16 pages, 312 KiB  
Review
Stem Cell Therapy for Aging Related Diseases and Joint Diseases in Companion Animals
by Yanmin Wang, Michael Alexander, Todd Scott, Desiree C. T. Cox, Augusta Wellington, Mike K. S. Chan, Michelle B. F. Wong, Orn Adalsteinsson and Jonathan R. T. Lakey
Animals 2023, 13(15), 2457; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13152457 - 29 Jul 2023
Viewed by 2029
Abstract
Stem cell therapy is an attractive treatment for diseases in companion animals that cannot be treated by conventional veterinary medicine practices. The unique properties of stem cells, particularly the ability to differentiate into specific cell types, makes them a focal point in regenerative [...] Read more.
Stem cell therapy is an attractive treatment for diseases in companion animals that cannot be treated by conventional veterinary medicine practices. The unique properties of stem cells, particularly the ability to differentiate into specific cell types, makes them a focal point in regenerative medicine treatments. Stem cell transplantation, especially using mesenchymal stem cells, has been proposed as a means to treat a wide range of injuries and ailments, resulting in tissue regeneration or repair. This review aims to summarize the veterinary use of stem cells for treating age-related and joint diseases, which are common conditions in pets. While additional research is necessary and certain limitations exist, the potential of stem cell therapy for companion animals is immense. Full article
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