Special Issue "Rumen Microbiota: Higher Efficiency through a Balanced Ecosystem"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 2209

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Frederique Chaucheyras-Durand
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Blagnac, France, and INRAE, Université Clermont Auvergne, UMR MEDIS, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Interests: rumen microbiota; functions; colonization; probiotics; live yeasts
Dr. Evelyne Forano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INRAE, Université Clermont Auvergne, UMR MEDIS, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Interests: gut microbiota; rumen microbial activity; colonization; STEC carriage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the last decade, there has been a tremendous growing interest around gut microbiota in humans and animals. We are now aware that gut microbiota plays numerous key roles in nutrition, health and welfare of their hosts. In ruminants, the first description of an abundant and diversified microbiota in the rumen was reported a long time ago, and as such rumen microbiology represents a pioneering research field that is still taken as example for many fundamental ecology concepts in different natural ecosystems.

For nutritionists, the rumen has been for long considered as a kind of black box, nevertheless with the awareness that it was playing a crucial role in feed degradation and fermentation, driving productivity in dairy of meat producing ruminants. From early microbiology studies to more recent research using omics approaches, the scientific community has gained a lot of knowledge on the diversity, composition and functions of rumen microbiota, and on the biotic and abiotic factors which may affect rumen microbial efficiency. The impact of rumen microbiota activity on the environment, through polluting outputs, on product quality and safety, and on global animal welfare and health are being largely studied currently but a lot of research still needs to be done to better understand these complex interactions at the animal level.

Modern precision farming has to take into account individual variability in terms of rumen efficiency in order to define strategies to improve production objectives and in this context, it is of primary importance to understand relationships within rumen microbial communities and between microbiota and the host animal, in a context where climate change, food safety and nutritional quality, or animal welfare, are of great concern for both producers and consumers.

Within the frame of precision farming, the use of non-antibiotic feed supplements could represent nice opportunities for producers to fine-tune mechanisms and functions of rumen microbiota, with potential benefits outside the rumen too.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present recent research and reviews focused on the role of rumen microbiota as a driver of efficiency, health and welfare, and on strategies to improve rumen function with the aim of stimulating interest, understanding and exploration of this important subject.

Dr. Frederique Chaucheyras-Durand
Dr. Evelyne Forano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Rumen
  • Microbiota
  • Activity
  • Omics
  • Functions
  • Probiotics
  • Rumen Efficiency
  • Health
  • Methane
  • Feed Degradation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Ruminal Lipopolysaccharides Analysis: Uncharted Waters with Promising Signs
Animals 2021, 11(1), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11010195 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1735
Abstract
The objective of this review is to present the need for the development of a comprehensive ruminal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extraction, purification and analysis protocol and state hypotheses that could contribute to planning novel strategies against ruminal acidosis. Lipopolysaccharide is an immunostimulatory molecule of [...] Read more.
The objective of this review is to present the need for the development of a comprehensive ruminal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extraction, purification and analysis protocol and state hypotheses that could contribute to planning novel strategies against ruminal acidosis. Lipopolysaccharide is an immunostimulatory molecule of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and has been reported to contribute to ruminal acidosis in cattle. Bacterial death and lysis are normal processes, and thus LPS is normally present in ruminal fluid. However, ruminal LPS concentration is much greater during subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Contrary to the widely known LPSs, ruminal LPS seems to be composed of a variety of LPS chemotypes that may interact with each other resulting in an LPS “mixture”. Hypotheses regarding the influence of each specific ruminal bacterial specie to innate immunity during SARA, and the representativeness of the exclusive use of the Escherichia coli LPS to rumen epithelial tissue challenges, could expand our knowledge regarding SARA. In addition, possible correlation between the monomeric Toll-like Receptor 4 (TRL4) and the antagonistic penta-acylated lipid A of LPS could contribute to novel strategies to tackle this nutrition disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rumen Microbiota: Higher Efficiency through a Balanced Ecosystem)
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