Special Issue "Behavior and Physical Health Integration in Companion Animals"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2022 | Viewed by 1933

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Belén Rosado
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Patología Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: dogs; cats; behaviour; animal welfare; stress; comparative medicine: diseases in humans and animals; cognitive dysfunction; epilepsy; microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sylvia García-Belenguer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Patología Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: dogs; cats; behaviour; animal welfare; stress; comparative medicine: diseases in humans and animals; cognitive dysfunction; epilepsy; microbiota
Dr. Ángela González-Martínez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Veterinary Teaching Hospital Rof Codina. Behaviour Medicine Service. Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Facultad de Veterinaria de Lugo, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: dogs; cats; behavior; animal welfare; stress; comparative medicine: diseases in humans and animals; cognitive dysfunction; behavioral medicine; ADHD-like
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Edition of the journal Animals, which endeavours to delve into the knowledge of the relationship between behavioural and physical factors in companion animals. Behavioural problems have been traditionally considered almost as diagnosis of exclusion. However, behavioural and physical health are not separate but interdependent entities. Behavioural medicine increasingly considers a much more diffuse boundary between medical and ethological aetiologies. In fact, a high incidence of comorbidities with medical conditions has been detected in animals showing behavioural problems. Moreover, stress, and even temperament, may predispose to some illnesses. Integration of these and other factors during veterinary consultation may allow a better understanding of behavioural problems and medical conditions, thereby improving the effectiveness of treatments. In this Special Issue, we would like to extend an invitation to publish the latest research on the topic of integration of physical–behavioural health in dogs and cats, and we hope it will make a major contribution to knowledge and practice. Also we would like to thank the sponsorship of Boehringer Ingelheim and Ceva for this special issue.

Dr. Belén Rosado
Dr. Sylvia García-Belenguer
Dr. Ángela González-Martínez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • behaviour
  • physical health
  • dog
  • cats
  • comorbidities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Reasons for and Behavioral Consequences of Male Dog Castration—A Questionnaire Study in Poland
Animals 2022, 12(15), 1883; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12151883 - 23 Jul 2022
Viewed by 914
Abstract
In many Western countries, castration is the most popular surgical desexing procedure in dogs. The aim of the study was to identify the reasons for male dog castration and to determine the owners’ perceptions about changes in dog behavior before and after castration. [...] Read more.
In many Western countries, castration is the most popular surgical desexing procedure in dogs. The aim of the study was to identify the reasons for male dog castration and to determine the owners’ perceptions about changes in dog behavior before and after castration. An online survey was posted on social networking sites dedicated to dogs. A total of 386 respondents participated in the survey. The main reason (39%) for castration was undesirable behavior, including hyperactivity (8%), roaming (8%), mounting (7%), aggression (5%), marking (5%) and others (5%). This surgery did not change the prevalence of aggressive behaviors towards people, but it reduced aggressive behaviors towards dogs and other animals. Castration did not reduce the presentation of anxious behavior in fearful dogs. Castration increased the number of dogs that were fearful of unfamiliar dogs/humans, as well as dogs with sound phobias, while decreased the prevalence of hiding behavior. This procedure greatly decreased incidences of roaming, mounting and urine marking as well as the dog’s overall activity. Thus, it can be concluded that while castration can resolve many undesirable behaviors in male dogs, the arguments for and against neutering should always be considered on an individual basis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavior and Physical Health Integration in Companion Animals)
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Article
Sleep Characteristics in Dogs; Effect on Caregiver-Reported Problem Behaviours
by and
Animals 2022, 12(14), 1753; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12141753 - 08 Jul 2022
Viewed by 530
Abstract
Optimal sleep duration and quality is difficult to define. There are strong arguments for a relationship between sleep, in particular REM sleep, and emotional health and behaviour in a variety of species. This study aims to broaden the level of knowledge regarding canine [...] Read more.
Optimal sleep duration and quality is difficult to define. There are strong arguments for a relationship between sleep, in particular REM sleep, and emotional health and behaviour in a variety of species. This study aims to broaden the level of knowledge regarding canine sleep durations and characteristics and begin research into the relationship between behavioural responses and the duration and quality of sleep. A caregiver questionnaire was used to capture information regarding the duration and characteristics of canine sleep, how easily this cohort of dogs were disturbed from sleep, and caregiver perceptions of the severity of problem behaviours shown by this cohort (n = 1330). A quadratic relationship between canine sleep duration whilst a caregiver is in bed and severity of problem behaviour is shown, with less than 8 h sleep and more than 10 h sleep correlating with increased severity of problem behaviours in this cohort. Dogs which were more easily disturbed from sleep at times their caregiver was out of bed, showed increased reported severity of problem behaviours. Whilst it is not possible to determine an optimal canine sleep duration, sufficient evidence is presented to argue that problem behaviour should not be remedied by sleep deprivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavior and Physical Health Integration in Companion Animals)
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