Advances in Small Animal Ophthalmic Surgery (Volume II)

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 18 August 2024 | Viewed by 4996

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Naples Federico II, Via Federico Delpino 1, 80137 Napoli, Italy
Interests: veterinary surgery; veterinary ophthalmology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Naples Federico II, Via Federico Delpino 1, 80137 Napoli, Italy
Interests: veterinary surgery; equine medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Naples Federico II, Via Federico Delpino 1, 80137 Napoli, Italy
Interests: veterinary surgery; veterinary oncology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

I am delighted to present a Special Issue on the topic of "Advances in Small Animal Ophthalmic Surgery (Volume II)".

The latest technological developments and advanced surgical techniques have radically impacted the clinical practice of veterinary ophthalmic surgeons, with new diagnostic and treatment procedures making small animals' ophthalmic surgery safer, faster, and more precise.

This Special Issue aims to provide examples of new diagnostic and surgical procedures in the different subfields of small animals' ophthalmology. Published papers will describe new developments in these areas. This Special Issue accepts high-quality articles containing original research results, as well as review articles and case series of an exceptional merit.

Prof. Dr. Barbara Lamagna
Prof. Dr. Maria Pia Pasolini
Prof. Dr. Luigi Navas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • small animals' ocular surgery
  • small animals' ocular imaging
  • ocular diagnostic tools
  • anterior segment surgery
  • eyelids
  • third eyelid
  • cornea
  • cataract
  • glaucoma
  • ocular trauma

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2635 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Intracameral Triamcinolone Acetonide on Controlling Common Complications following Phacoemulsification in Dogs
by Zichen Liu, Di Lu, Mo Pang, Jing Li, Yue Liu, Hao Shi, Gang Liu and Yipeng Jin
Animals 2024, 14(4), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14040547 - 07 Feb 2024
Viewed by 579
Abstract
The intracameral injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) has achieved favorable clinical effects in controlling intraocular inflammatory reactions in humans after cataract surgery. However, the effect of this method remains unclear in veterinary practice. In this paper, 18 dogs with bilateral cataracts were randomly [...] Read more.
The intracameral injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) has achieved favorable clinical effects in controlling intraocular inflammatory reactions in humans after cataract surgery. However, the effect of this method remains unclear in veterinary practice. In this paper, 18 dogs with bilateral cataracts were randomly divided into three groups, with 6 dogs in each group. Phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation were performed on the 36 eyes of these dogs. A total of 0.1 mL of TA solution was injected into the oculus dexter (OD) anterior chambers. All oculus sinister (OS) anterior chambers of these dogs were used as controls. The results demonstrated that the corneal edema severity scores of the OD (1.5 mg TA) were lower than those of the OS from the 1st to 7th day after surgery, with a significant difference on the 3rd day after surgery (p = 0.033). The corneal edema severity scores in the OD (1.5 mg TA) were significantly lower than those in the OD (0.5 mg TA) on the 3rd day after surgery (p = 0.036). The aqueous humor protein concentration of the OD (1.5 mg TA) had a lower concentration than the OS on the 1st day after surgery (p = 0.004). Furthermore, on the 5th and 10th days, the aqueous humor protein concentration of the OD (1.5 mg TA) was lower than that of the OS (p = 0.038 and p = 0.044, respectively). The aqueous humor PGE2 concentration of the OD (1.5 mg TA) had a lower concentration than the OS on the 1st day after surgery (p = 0.026). The aqueous humor PGE2 concentrations in the OD (1.0 mg TA) and OD (1.5 mg TA) were lower compared to that in the OD (0.5 mg TA) on the 1st day after surgery (p = 0.041 and p = 0.037, respectively). It was demonstrated that TA-based treatment can be safely employed to effectively control common complications after phacoemulsification in dogs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Small Animal Ophthalmic Surgery (Volume II))
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14 pages, 2197 KiB  
Article
Outcomes of Treatment of Eyelids and Third Eyelid Tumours in Dogs Using High-Frequency Radiowave Surgery
by Luigi Navas, Cristina Di Palma, Maria Pia Pasolini, Chiara Montano, Mariaelena de Chiara, Francesco Lamagna, Valeria Uccello, Fabiana Micieli, Claudia Amalfitano, Orlando Paciello and Barbara Lamagna
Animals 2023, 13(13), 2105; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13132105 - 25 Jun 2023
Viewed by 4068
Abstract
In human ophthalmology, the benefits of using high-frequency radiowave (HFR) electrocautery for surgical procedures were demonstrated and include effective haemostasis, shorter surgery times, and rapid recovery. In canine eyelid surgery, intraoperative bleeding is a common feature that may obscure the surgical field view [...] Read more.
In human ophthalmology, the benefits of using high-frequency radiowave (HFR) electrocautery for surgical procedures were demonstrated and include effective haemostasis, shorter surgery times, and rapid recovery. In canine eyelid surgery, intraoperative bleeding is a common feature that may obscure the surgical field view and lead to the increased swelling of adjacent tissues, bruising, and pain. To evaluate the efficacy and benefits of HFR electrocautery in canine eyelid and third eyelid surgery, the medical records of 48 surgical excisions of eyelid tumours (involving up to one-third of the eyelid length) and 4 third eyelid excisions were reviewed. The information was collected including the breed, age, clinical signs, HFR power setting and mode of the surgical unit, electrode used for the surgery, intraoperative complications, histopathological diagnosis, and postoperative outcomes. Surgical techniques were performed using the Surgitron Dual 3.8 MHz Frequency RF device (Ellman International, Oceanside, NY, USA). Intraoperative bleeding was recorded as absent or very mild, and the surgical procedures were very fast. No complications occurred during the procedures. Healing within 10 days was observed in all the dogs. No tumour recurrences were recorded at the 12-month follow-up. HFR electrosurgery proved to be a safe, effective, and easy-to-perform technique for the removal of eyelid and third eyelid tumours in dogs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Small Animal Ophthalmic Surgery (Volume II))
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