New Advances in Canine and Feline Diagnostics—2nd Edition

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 November 2024 | Viewed by 4390

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: veterinary hematology; dog and cat vector-borne diseases; veterinary neurology
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Guest Editor
Unit of Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Sciences, Messina University, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: veterinary medicine; ultrasonography; contrast-enhanced ultrasound; internal medicine
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Guest Editor
Unit of Physiopathology and Clinic of Reproduction, Department of Veterinary Sciences, Messina University, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: veterinary medicine; ultrasonography; contrast-enhanced ultrasound; reproduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: animal pathology; diagnosis and staging neoplastic; histopathology; immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Canine and feline laboratory and imaging diagnostics have undergone significant developments in recent years and the aim of this Special Issue is to provide a source of articles related to these fields. The topics of interest in this Special Issue concern new insights into canine and feline clinical chemistry, endocrinology, hematology, immunology, diagnosis and staging neoplastic, histopathology, immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence and diagnostic imaging.

Dr. Marisa Masucci
Prof. Dr. Massimo De Majo
Prof. Dr. Marco Quartuccio
Dr. Claudia Rifici
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • clinical chemistry
  • endocrinology
  • hematology
  • immunology
  • diagnosis and staging neoplastic
  • histopathology
  • immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence
  • diagnostic imaging
  • dog
  • cat

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 739 KiB  
Article
Whole Blood Viscosity Reference Intervals and Its Correlation with Hematology and Serum Chemistry in Cats Using Scanning Capillary Method
by Chae-Yeong Lee, Sung-Lim Lee, Eunju Kim, Jinsu Kang, Sunjun Jung, Namsoo Kim, Jinmu Jung, Dong Hwan Lee, Yoon-Ho Roh and Dongbin Lee
Animals 2023, 13(23), 3694; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13233694 - 29 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Whole blood viscosity, a hemorheological factor, is currently used for diagnosis, as it is correlated with various vascular diseases that are difficult to diagnose early with a general blood test. It was determined that it was necessary to set reference intervals for further [...] Read more.
Whole blood viscosity, a hemorheological factor, is currently used for diagnosis, as it is correlated with various vascular diseases that are difficult to diagnose early with a general blood test. It was determined that it was necessary to set reference intervals for further studies and utilization of whole blood viscosity in cats, a representative companion animal, and this study was conducted. Fifty healthy cats were recruited for the study, and whole blood viscosity, complete blood count, and serum chemistry tests were performed. The reference intervals of whole blood viscosity were 15.169 to 43.684 cP at a shear rate of 1 s−1 reflecting diastole, and 3.524 to 5.544 cP at a shear rate of 300 s−1 reflecting systole. Red blood cells, hematocrit, hemoglobin, white blood cells, and neutrophils in the complete blood count, and total protein, albumin, globulin, and cholesterol in the serum chemistry were significantly correlated with whole blood viscosity. The results of this study set the reference intervals of whole blood viscosity for healthy cats in a wide shear rate range that has not yet been fully established, and its correlation with other blood indicators investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Canine and Feline Diagnostics—2nd Edition)
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13 pages, 290 KiB  
Article
Serum Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E in Cats with Inflammatory Bronchial Disease
by Lina Hörner-Schmid, Jelena Palić, Ralf S. Mueller and Bianka Schulz
Animals 2023, 13(20), 3226; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13203226 - 15 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1513
Abstract
The etiology of feline inflammatory bronchial disease is poorly understood. This study compares the degree of allergen-specific serum IgE responses between cats with feline asthma, chronic bronchitis, mixed inflammation, and clinically healthy cats (HCs). The retrospective case–control study used serum from eighteen cats [...] Read more.
The etiology of feline inflammatory bronchial disease is poorly understood. This study compares the degree of allergen-specific serum IgE responses between cats with feline asthma, chronic bronchitis, mixed inflammation, and clinically healthy cats (HCs). The retrospective case–control study used serum from eighteen cats with eosinophilic inflammation (EI), ten with neutrophilic inflammation (NI), six with mixed inflammation (MI), and fourteen HCs. Affected cats were categorized into groups based on bronchoalveolar lavage cytology. The measurement of IgE for 34 different allergens including fungal organisms, weeds, grasses, trees, mites, and insects was performed using an indirect ELISA. Positive reactions to allergens were detected in the serum of 17/18 cats with EI, 8/10 with NI, 6/6 with MI, and 11/14 HCs (p = 0.364). When overall positive reactions were compared between groups, cats with MI (p = <0.01) had significantly more positive reactions against mite allergens than HCs. Blood eosinophils inversely correlated with the absolute amount of allergen-specific serum IgE expressed in ELISA absorbance units (EAs) (p = 0.014). Sensitization against dust mites seems to be more prevalent in cats with MI. However, positive IgE reactions can be observed in healthy and diseased cats, and, therefore, need to be interpreted in the light of clinical findings and environmental conditions of individual patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Canine and Feline Diagnostics—2nd Edition)

Review

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13 pages, 527 KiB  
Review
M-Mode Echocardiography in Canine Veterinary Practice: A Comprehensive Review of Left Ventricular Measurements in 44 Different Dog Breeds
by Maria Cerbu, Constantin Cerbu and Ionel Papuc
Animals 2023, 13(18), 2986; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13182986 - 21 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1581
Abstract
This review article focuses on the use of canine M-mode in veterinary medicine, specifically in assessing the left ventricle measurements in several breeds. It traces the historical development of echocardiography techniques, including A-mode, B-mode, and motion mode (M-mode), which provide accurate unidimensional records [...] Read more.
This review article focuses on the use of canine M-mode in veterinary medicine, specifically in assessing the left ventricle measurements in several breeds. It traces the historical development of echocardiography techniques, including A-mode, B-mode, and motion mode (M-mode), which provide accurate unidimensional records of cardiac structures. This article highlights the significance of M-mode measurements in diagnosing stage B2 of MMVD, where left ventricular end-diastolic internal diameter corrected with body weight (LVIDdN) is essential for identifying cardiac enlargement. It also explains the role of M-mode in diagnosing DCM, outlining criteria such as left ventricular dilatation. The authors emphasize the importance of breed-specific reference values for echocardiographic measurements due to variations in somatotype among dogs. This review provides a comprehensive table summarizing M-mode measurements of the left ventricle for 44 different dog breeds, including interventricular septum thickness, left ventricular internal diameter, and left ventricular posterior wall thickness during systole and diastole. This review’s methodology involves compiling data from various scientific literature sources, providing an extensive tabular representation of M-mode measurements for different breeds, ages, and sexes. Overall, this review highlights the critical role of M-mode echocardiography in diagnosing and managing cardiac diseases in dogs, underscores the importance of breed-specific reference values, and presents a comprehensive summary of M-mode measurements for various dog breeds, aiding both clinicians and researchers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Canine and Feline Diagnostics—2nd Edition)
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