Special Issue "Impacts of Climate Change on Sustainable Agricultural Development"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Liette Vasseur
Website
Guest Editor
Brock University, UNESCO Chair in Community Sustainability, Niagara Region, 1812 Sir Isaac Brock Way, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada
Interests: sustainable agriculture; climate change adaptation; ecosystem management; biodiversity; rural communities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable agricultural development is an essential step for achieving Goal 2 (end hunger) of the Sustainable Development Goals under the United Nations 2030 Agenda. Sustainable agriculture can include different approaches that aim to reduce the current impacts of agriculture on the planet while ensuring food security. It may include, but not be limited to, conservation agriculture, agroecology, and ecological engineering. Sustainable agroecosystems promote resilience, biodiversity, and spatial heterogeneity, not only in the field but also at the landscape level. Under climate change, such systems will become even more crucial. However, we still need to understand how and what approaches will be the most effective under the current scenarios of climate change. This Special Issue aims to examine these aspects, looking at the impacts of climate change on sustainable agriculture development from different geographical points of view. I would like to invite you to submit an original manuscript that can contribute to better understanding these challenges and what strategies may be effective in the long term for the sustainability of our agricultural world.

Prof. Liette Vasseur
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development goals
  • sustainable agriculture
  • climate change
  • biodiversity
  • drought
  • extreme events
  • water
  • agroecology
  • conservation agriculture
  • resilience
  • agriculture development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
“Are They Aware, and Why?” Bayesian Analysis of Predictors of Smallholder Farmers’ Awareness of Climate Change and Its Risks to Agriculture
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030376 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
While climate change threatens global food security, health, and nutrition outcomes, Africa is more vulnerable because its economies largely depend on rain-fed agriculture. Thus, there is need for agricultural producers in Africa to employ robust adaptive measures that withstand the risks of climate [...] Read more.
While climate change threatens global food security, health, and nutrition outcomes, Africa is more vulnerable because its economies largely depend on rain-fed agriculture. Thus, there is need for agricultural producers in Africa to employ robust adaptive measures that withstand the risks of climate change. However, the success of adaptation measures to climate change primarily depends on the communities’ knowledge or awareness of climate change and its risks. Nonetheless, existing empirical research is still limited to illuminate farmers’ awareness of the climate change problem. This study employs a Bayesian hierarchical logistic model, estimated using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) methods, to empirically determine drivers of smallholder farmers’ awareness of climate change and its risks to agriculture in Zambia. The results suggest that on average, 77% of farmers in Zambia are aware of climate change and its risks to agriculture. We find socio-demographics, climate change information sources, climate change adaptive factors, and climate change impact-related shocks as predictors of the expression of climate change awareness. We suggest that farmers should be given all the necessary information about climate change and its risks to agriculture. Most importantly, the drivers identified can assist policymakers to provide the effective extension and advisory services that would enhance the understanding of climate change among farmers in synergy with appropriate farm-level climate-smart agricultural practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Sustainable Agricultural Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Identifying the Critical Stage Near Anthesis for Waterlogging on Wheat Yield and Its Components in the Yangtze River Basin, China
Agronomy 2020, 10(1), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10010130 - 16 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Frequent waterlogging near anthesis is a primary constraint for wheat production in the Yangtze River Basin, China. This study aimed to identify the critical stage for waterlogging on wheat yield and its components and identify the possible factors determining this stage. In the [...] Read more.
Frequent waterlogging near anthesis is a primary constraint for wheat production in the Yangtze River Basin, China. This study aimed to identify the critical stage for waterlogging on wheat yield and its components and identify the possible factors determining this stage. In the first experiment (E1), we evaluated three varieties and initiated a 10-day waterlogging starting at the stem elongation (S1), booting (S2), and anthesis (S3) stages. In the second experiment (E2), waterlogging was applied at the stem elongation (S1) and anthesis (S3) stages and for three durations (five, 10, and 15 days). In E1, waterlogging at S1 and S2 resulted in a lower grain yield than at S3. In the second year of E1, grain yield under waterlogging at S1 and S3 was similar but significantly lower than under waterlogging conditions at S2. Waterlogging at S1 and S2 greatly decreased the kernel number per spike and 1000-kernel weight, but waterlogging at S3 only decreased the 1000-kernel weight. Moreover, different varieties did not change the stages mostly reducing grain yield and yield components. In E2, grain yield decreased with prolonged exposure to waterlogging and was significantly lower under 15-day conditions than the five-day conditions. There was no significant interaction between the stage and duration of waterlogging. Finally, our results indicate that in yield formation, a greater reliance on kernel weight instead of the kernel number per spike can contribute to a reduction in yield loss for waterlogging at S1 and S2. This study, therefore, indicates that the stem elongation stage is the most affected by waterlogging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Sustainable Agricultural Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Ascorbic Acid Priming Enhances Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Winter Wheat under Low Temperature Due to Late Sowing in Pakistan
Agronomy 2019, 9(11), 757; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9110757 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Poor seed germination is a crucial yield-limiting factor when winter wheat is sown under low temperature. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of ascorbic acid (AsA) in the extenuation of the harmful effects of low temperature at early and [...] Read more.
Poor seed germination is a crucial yield-limiting factor when winter wheat is sown under low temperature. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of ascorbic acid (AsA) in the extenuation of the harmful effects of low temperature at early and reproductive stages of wheat during 2016–2017 (15 November to 15 December). A two-year experiment was conducted using a randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement and with three replicates. Sowing dates (15 November and 15 December) were allotted to the main plot while seed priming (control, hydro-priming, and AsA priming) were allotted to the sub-plot. Results demonstrated that AsA priming significantly boosted different yield characteristics including chlorophyll content, tillers per unit area, number of grains per spike, and 1000-grain weight, contributing higher productivity and biomass during 2016–2017. The results further revealed that AsA could induce the up-regulation of diverse antioxidants (super oxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT)), thus offsetting the adverse effects of sub-supra optimum temperatures of late sowing wheat. It is therefore concluded in this work that AsA priming enhances stand establishment, yield and yield-related traits, antioxidant enzyme activities, and chlorophyll contents when wheat is sown under low temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Sustainable Agricultural Development)
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