Black Carbon and Its Effects on Crop Productivity and Nutrient Cycling

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 5255

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Engineering and Safety, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: alternative fuel; agricultural engineering; evaluation of technologies; biomass and bioenergy; renewable energy

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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Machines, Faculty of Engineering, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129 St., 165 21 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: soil problems; erosion; soil tillage
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on “Black Carbon and Its Effects on Crop Productivity and Nutrient Cycling” aims to move agriculture toward a better and sustainable future. It is common knowledge that less and less land has to feed more and more people on our planet. It is therefore essential to pay more attention to soil fertility than ever before. The use of black carbon is one of the most promising solutions for this important matter. In your papers, we expect the transfer of experience with the use of black carbon in various conditions. We consider the transfer of experience to be the most important message of our Special Issue. We strongly believe that your publications will lead to improved soil properties worldwide and thus contribute to the development of modern agriculture and sustainability. Sustainable and at the same time efficient agriculture is, after all, the only way to feed eight billion people.

Prof. Dr. Algirdas Jasinskas
Dr. Petr Novák
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • crop yield
  • soil properties
  • soil fertility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1692 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Use of Biochar, Poultry and Cattle Manure for the Production of Organic Granular Fertilizers
by Aloyzas Gaudutis, Eglė Jotautienė, Ramūnas Mieldažys, Vaidas Bivainis and Algirdas Jasinskas
Agronomy 2023, 13(5), 1426; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13051426 - 22 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2923
Abstract
In agricultural activities, there is an increasing need for organic fertilizers to use nature-friendly materials used to fertilize the soil. Farmers have been using granular organic fertilizers made from composted or dried manure of cattle, poultry, pigs, ash, bone meal, and other materials [...] Read more.
In agricultural activities, there is an increasing need for organic fertilizers to use nature-friendly materials used to fertilize the soil. Farmers have been using granular organic fertilizers made from composted or dried manure of cattle, poultry, pigs, ash, bone meal, and other materials for some time, but the quantities of these organic fertilizers are not large. Biochar is also being intensively studied as a material to improve soil quality and plant growth and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from soil. The suitability of cattle manure compost, poultry manure, biochar, and their combinations for granular fertilizers was analyzed in this work. The preparation of biochar for granulation may have differences compared to other organic materials due to the moisture content, fractional composition, bulk density, and other parameters of the granulated material, so this work examines the physical–mechanical and chemical properties of cattle and poultry manure and biochar raw material and the final granulated product. Research has found that the fractional composition of raw materials under investigation manure and biochar was up to 2 mm. The moisture content of the studied raw material varied from 8.97% in the case of poultry manure to 25.11% in the case of cattle manure compost. The lowest moisture content was obtained due to additional drying. The addition of biochar reduces the granule density in investigated cases. Poultry manure granules were the most mechanically stable, with a semi-static stability of 382.6 ± 78.08 N. After the addition of biochar, weaker binding properties were determined in the experimental granules. Analysis of the composition of elements shows that these granules can be used for fertilization or soil improvement. High concentrations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were detected in the granules. The obtained results showed that it is appropriate to enrich the manure granules with biochar. Full article
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19 pages, 21125 KiB  
Article
Combination of Biochar with N–Fertilizer Affects Properties of Soil and N2O emissions in Maize Crop
by Tatijana Kotuš, Vladimír Šimanský, Katarína Drgoňová, Marek Illéš, Elżbieta Wójcik-Gront, Eugene Balashov, Natalya Buchkina, Elena Aydın and Ján Horák
Agronomy 2022, 12(6), 1314; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12061314 - 30 May 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1817
Abstract
One of the challenges of harnessing higher productivity levels and sustainability of agriculture related to N fertilization is in expanding soil N2O emissions, which has become a serious issue in recent years. Recent studies suggest that biochar may be the solution [...] Read more.
One of the challenges of harnessing higher productivity levels and sustainability of agriculture related to N fertilization is in expanding soil N2O emissions, which has become a serious issue in recent years. Recent studies suggest that biochar may be the solution to this problem, but there is still a knowledge gap related to biochar application rates and its reapplication in Central Europe; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of biochar (initial application and reapplication in 2014 and 2018, respectively, at rates of 0, 10 and 20 t ha−1) combined with N-fertilizer (N0—0 kg N ha−1; N1—108 kg N ha−1 and N2—162 kg N ha−1) during the growing season of maize in 2019 (warm temperature with normal precipitation) on the changes of soil properties and N2O emissions in the silty loam, Haplic Luvisol, in the temperate climate of Slovakia. The results showed that the application and reapplication of biochar proved to be an excellent tool for increasing soil pH (in the range 7–13%), soil organic carbon—Corg (2–212%), and reducing the soil’s NH4+ (41–69%); however, there were more pronounced positive effects when biochar was combined with N-fertilizer at the higher level (N2). The same effects were found in the case of N2O emissions (reduction in the range 33–83%). Biochar applied without N-fertilizer and combined with the higher fertilizer level had a suppressive effect on N2O emissions. Biochar did not have any effect on maize yield in 2019. Full article
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