Potentially Toxic Elements in Agricultural Soils: Contaminant Characteristics and Coping Strategies

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 1826

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
LEAF, School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, 1649-004 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: soil pollution; trace elements; soil quality assessment; organic wastes valorization; soil amendments; phytoremediation
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Co-Guest Editor
Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura (CEBAS), CSIC, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: soil chemistry; trace elements; contaminated soils; phytoremediation; organic amendments; waste biomass valorization; anaerobic digestion; arsenic; eco-toxicology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Soil Science Erosion and Land Protection, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation – State Research Institute, Pulawy, Poland
Interests: soil contamination and remediation; food contamination; land use change; soil quality; soil sealing; waste management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soils all around the world have suffered from years of diffuse and point-source contamination with a wide range of contaminants. Potentially toxic elements (PTEs) represent a major group of contaminants affecting agricultural soils, and the pressure to increase agricultural production has intensified the use of fertilizers, pesticides, and waste-derived amendments which contribute to the introduction of PTEs into agricultural soils. Solutions are urgently needed to prevent further soil pollution, but also to find how to produce healthy food from low-quality agricultural soils, while avoiding the risk of PTEs entering the food chain. Understanding the behavior of PTEs in the soil–plant system and how to control their bioavailability is crucial to find appropriate/successful coping strategies.

This Special Issue aims to cover new studies and approaches concerning agricultural soil contamination with PTEs, including concentrations, emerging PTEs, legal limits, soil–plant system behaviors, effects on soil biota, risk evaluation, practices to prevent soil contamination and mitigating the risk, strategies to control bioavailability, and agricultural soil remediation.

Dr. Paula Alvarenga
Dr. Rafael Clemente
Dr. Grzegorz Siebielec
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • agricultural soil contamination
  • potentially toxic elements
  • bioavailability
  • soil amendments
  • fertilizers
  • pesticides
  • waste-derived amendments
  • ecotoxicology
  • risk assessment
  • phytoremediation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 989 KiB  
Article
Rare Earth Elements Transfer from Soil to Vegetables and Health Risks Associated with Vegetable Consumption in a Former Mining Area
by Mirela Miclean, Erika Andrea Levei, Claudiu Tanaselia and Oana Cadar
Agronomy 2023, 13(5), 1399; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13051399 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1329
Abstract
Rare earth elements (REEs) and 18 other elements in the vegetables (carrot, parsley, cabbage, potato, onion) and soils from two villages near tailings management facilities in the Baia Mare area, NW Romania, were measured. The soil-to-plant transfer and the health risks posed by [...] Read more.
Rare earth elements (REEs) and 18 other elements in the vegetables (carrot, parsley, cabbage, potato, onion) and soils from two villages near tailings management facilities in the Baia Mare area, NW Romania, were measured. The soil-to-plant transfer and the health risks posed by the consumption of these vegetables were also assessed. The pseudo-total concentrations of elements varied widely in the soil and vegetables, with the lowest concentrations being found for Ta (2.1 µg/kg) and the highest for Fe (9219 mg/kg). The concentration of total light REEs (LREEs) was considerably higher than that of heavy REEs (HREEs). The percentages of available elements were <20% of the pseudo-total concentration, except for Zn, Cd, and Pb, where the available fractions were much higher. Generally, the soil-to-plant transfer factors decreased in the following order: parsley > onion > cabbage > carrot > potato, and varied from element to element. The LREEs were less absorbed than the HREEs in all investigated vegetable species. Pearson correlations revealed strong positive correlations between the lanthanides, except for Eu, in the soil and vegetables. No important health risks following the consumption of vegetables were found for REEs, the estimated daily intake of REEs through vegetable consumption being much lower than the acceptable daily intake. Full article
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