Special Issue "Newborn Hearing Screening"

A special issue of International Journal of Neonatal Screening (ISSN 2409-515X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Inken Brockow

Screening center, Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority, Veterinärstr. 2, 85764, Oberschleißheim, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Newborn Hearing screening; Neonatal Screening; Hearing Disorder; Epidemiology; Tracking
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rainer Schönweiler

Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lübeck, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Newborn Hearing Screening Audiology; Speech-language disorders; Voice disorders; Phonosurgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With a prevalence of 1–3 per 1000 newborns, congenital hearing loss is among the most frequent inborn disorders. Meanwhile, several studies have shown that early identification of childhood hearing loss leads to better speech and language development. Therefore, newborn hearing screening (NHS) has become a standard of care in many countries. Some countries struggle to establish a universal screening program that reaches every child. In addition, there is still discussion about the cost-effectiveness and the best hearing screening protocols used, including technologies or modalities, staged procedures and time of first screening.

Delays in the confirmation of hearing loss can occur even in the presence of well-established universal newborn hearing screening programs. One of the reasons seems to be a high rate of loss to follow-up, which can be coped by tracking programs.

Recently, there has been increasing discussion to etablish a screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infections as this is the most common non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Neonatal Screening, devoted to "Newborn Hearing Screening” (NHS), will describe international experiences across the globe with newborn hearing screening, will discuss different screening protocols and cost-effectiveness, will outline the acutal standards of the confirmation diagnostic, and will consider the actual discussed screening for cCMV.

Dr. Inken Brockow
Prof. Dr. Rainer Schönweiler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Neonatal Screening is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Newborn Hearing Screening
  • Hearing Disorder
  • Newborn Hearing Screening Protocol
  • Loss to Follow-Up
  • Risk Factors for Hearing Deficits
  • Genetic Screening
  • Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Are ABO Blood Groups or Rh Antigen Perinatal Factors Affecting the Pass Rate of Transient Otoacoustic Emissions Screening Tests in Healthy Newborns during the First 48 h of Life?
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2019, 5(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns5010004
Received: 6 August 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
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Abstract
Most hospitals recommend performing neonatal hearing screening. Transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) tests represent an ideal technique for conducting this process. Previous studies have related the influence of ABO blood group and Rhesus antigens (Rh) on the susceptibility to various pathologies. However, available [...] Read more.
Most hospitals recommend performing neonatal hearing screening. Transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) tests represent an ideal technique for conducting this process. Previous studies have related the influence of ABO blood group and Rhesus antigens (Rh) on the susceptibility to various pathologies. However, available data about the potential relationship between ABO blood groups, Rh, and TEOAE pass rates are sparse. Recently, several authors concluded that O blood group and Rh+ are possible influential factors of TEOAE pass rates. Significantly different TEOAE amplitude response between the four main ABO blood groups were observed among normal-hearing individuals. Moreover, ABO blood groups were discussed as a possible influential factor for the development of noise-induced hearing loss later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between ABO blood groups, Rh, and the first TEOAE pass rates in healthy newborns. Data were retrospectively collected from healthy newborns at the maternity ward of F. Borja hospital in Gandia (Spain). Rh and ABO were compared with the results of TEOAE performed within the first 48 h of life. Results: the study group included 2765 newborns. No significant correlation between ABO blood group or Rh and TEOAE pass rates was observed in comparative tables. Conclusion: ABO blood group and Rhesus antigens do not appear to have a significant impact on the pass rate of TEOAE screening in healthy newborns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
Open AccessArticle The Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in Germany
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4(3), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns4030029
Received: 2 May 2018 / Revised: 31 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 September 2018 / Published: 16 September 2018
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Abstract
This article presents an overview of legal, methodological, organisational, financial, structural and technical aspects of the initial audiological measurement of newborns (screening), follow-up (diagnosis) and tracking the results (tracking) within the German newborn hearing screening programme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
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Open AccessArticle From Neonatal Hearing Screening to Intervention: Results of the Dutch Program for Neonatal Hearing Screening in Well Babies
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns4030027
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 23 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
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Abstract
In the Netherlands, Youth Health Care services (YHC) have been carrying out neonatal hearing screening (NHS) in newborns since 2006. The aim of the NHS is to identify children with permanent hearing loss, so that intervention can be started before the age of [...] Read more.
In the Netherlands, Youth Health Care services (YHC) have been carrying out neonatal hearing screening (NHS) in newborns since 2006. The aim of the NHS is to identify children with permanent hearing loss, so that intervention can be started before the age of 4 months. Early detection of hearing loss is important, as children who start intervention early have been shown to develop better. This article describes the structure and performance of the NHS carried out by the YHC, the quality of the program, and the timeliness of the start of intervention. Since its implementation, the NHS has been audited annually in order to monitor the program’s quality. Monitoring reports and data from the Dutch Foundation for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Child were used in this study. For many years, results have shown the NHS to be a stable screening program of high quality. The participation rate is high, refer percentage low, and the timeliness of the program is continually improving. Although the timeliness of post screening diagnostics and intervention need most improvement as they do not always meet the target times, this has improved over recent years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
Open AccessArticle Newborn Hearing Screening in Bavaria—Is It Possible to Reach the Quality Parameters?
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns4030026
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 24 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
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Abstract
Since the 1 January, 2009, newborn hearing screening (NHS) has been obligatory for every child in Germany. NHS is part of the Pediatrics Directive of the Federal Joint Committee. In this directive, details of the procedures and screening quality to be achieved are [...] Read more.
Since the 1 January, 2009, newborn hearing screening (NHS) has been obligatory for every child in Germany. NHS is part of the Pediatrics Directive of the Federal Joint Committee. In this directive, details of the procedures and screening quality to be achieved are given. We evaluate if these quality criteria were met in Bavaria in 2016. The NHS data of children born in 2016 in Bavaria were evaluated for quality criteria, such as screening coverage in screening facilities, screening methods, referral rate (rate of failed tests at discharge) and a child’s age at the diagnosis of a hearing disorder. NHS was documented for 116,776 children born in Bavaria in 2016. In the first step, 78,904 newborns were screened with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and 37,865 with automated auditory brainstem response. Of these, 9182 (7.8%) failed the first test in one or both ears. A second screening before discharge was performed on 53.3% of the newborns with a refer result in the first test, out of which 58.7% received a pass result. After the screening process, 4.6% of the newborns were discharged with a refer result. Only 18% of the first controls after discharge were performed by a pediatric audiologist. In 37.9% of the newborns, the screening center intervened to assure the control of any failed screening test. The median age of diagnosis for bilateral hearing loss was 5.3 months. In Bavaria, NHS was implemented successfully. A tracking system for all children who failed the hearing screening test is pivotal for early diagnosis and therapy of children with hearing deficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
Open AccessCommunication Setting up a Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in a Low-Income Country: Initial Findings from Malawi
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2017, 3(4), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns3040033
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 21 November 2017 / Accepted: 29 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (184 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Establishing a newborn hearing screening programme in a low-income country with poor communication infrastructure has unique challenges. Data from 195 infants in three different patient populations in Malawi who underwent hearing screening using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) testing were analysed to investigate [...] Read more.
Establishing a newborn hearing screening programme in a low-income country with poor communication infrastructure has unique challenges. Data from 195 infants in three different patient populations in Malawi who underwent hearing screening using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) testing were analysed to investigate the feasibility of a long-term screening programme. There were 65 infants in each group: infants from Group A were born in a private maternity unit, Group B attended a free community vaccination clinic, and Group C were receiving special care at a government hospital. 75% of infants requiring follow-up from the special-care baby unit were uncontactable following hospital discharge, and screening was discontinued there. Lost to follow-up rates after the first screen were lower from the private maternity unit (14%) and the community vaccination clinic (36%), and these screening programmes continue. A successful hearing screening programme requires extensive support services to manage infants requiring further testing and habilitation, this is not currently possible on a large scale in Malawi due to the small number of Audiology departments and trained staff. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)

Review

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Open AccessReview Newborn and Infant Hearing Screening Facing Globally Growing Numbers of People Suffering from Disabling Hearing Loss
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2019, 5(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns5010007
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 2 December 2018 / Accepted: 9 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract
Recent prevalence estimates indicate that in 2015 almost half a billion people—about 6.8% of the world’s population—had disabling hearing loss and that prevalence numbers will further increase. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently estimates that at least 34 million children under the age [...] Read more.
Recent prevalence estimates indicate that in 2015 almost half a billion people—about 6.8% of the world’s population—had disabling hearing loss and that prevalence numbers will further increase. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently estimates that at least 34 million children under the age of 15 have disabling hearing loss. Based on a 2012 WHO report, approximately 7.5 million of these children were under the age of 5 years. This review article focuses on the importance of high-quality newborn and infant hearing screening (NIHS) programs as one strategy to ameliorate disabling hearing loss as a global health problem. Two WHO resolutions regarding the prevention of deafness and hearing loss have been adopted urging member states to implement screening programs for early identification of ear diseases and hearing loss in babies and young children. The effectiveness of these programs depends on factors such as governmental mandates and guidance; presence of a national committee with involvement of professionals, industries, and stakeholders; central oversight of hearing screening; clear definition of target parameters; presence of tracking systems with bi-directional data transfer from screening devices to screening centers; accessibility of pediatric audiological services and rehabilitation programs; using telemedicine where connectivity is available; and the opportunity for case discussions in professional excellence circles with boards of experts. There is a lack of such programs in middle- and low-income countries, but even in high-income countries there is potential for improvement. Facing the still growing burden of disabling hearing loss around the world, there is a need to invest in national, high-quality NIHS programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
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Open AccessReview What Contribution Did Economic Evidence Make to the Adoption of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Policies in the United States?
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4(3), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns4030025
Received: 25 May 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
Universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS), when accompanied by timely access to intervention services, can improve language outcomes for children born deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) and result in economic benefits to society. Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs promote UNHS and [...] Read more.
Universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS), when accompanied by timely access to intervention services, can improve language outcomes for children born deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) and result in economic benefits to society. Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs promote UNHS and using information systems support access to follow-up diagnostic and early intervention services so that infants can be screened no later than 1 month of age, with those who do not pass their screen receiving diagnostic evaluation no later than 3 months of age, and those with diagnosed hearing loss receiving intervention services no later than 6 months of age. In this paper, we first document the rapid roll-out of UNHS/EHDI policies and programs at the national and state/territorial levels in the United States between 1997 and 2005. We then review cost analyses and economic arguments that were made in advancing those policies in the United States. Finally, we examine evidence on language and educational outcomes that pertain to the economic benefits of UNHS/EHDI. In conclusion, although formal cost-effectiveness analyses do not appear to have played a decisive role, informal economic assessments of costs and benefits appear to have contributed to the adoption of UNHS policies in the United States. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
Open AccessReview Potential Benefit of Selective CMV Testing after Failed Newborn Hearing Screening
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns4020020
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 13 June 2018 / Accepted: 19 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
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Abstract
Evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) were recently released by two independent expert groups. Of particular emphasis was the relationship between cCMV and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), a major component of the virus’ overall disease burden. In [...] Read more.
Evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) were recently released by two independent expert groups. Of particular emphasis was the relationship between cCMV and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), a major component of the virus’ overall disease burden. In this study, a literature review was performed to estimate the proportion of cCMV-related SNHL cases, which might be identified through selective cCMV testing following failed newborn hearing screening. Furthermore, it was of interest to estimate the potential benefit of emerging antiviral therapies. Currently, at most 10% of cCMV-related SNHL is likely to be identified clinically. Through use of a selective cCMV testing protocol, however, a significant improvement in the identification rate can be achieved. Recent expert group statements strongly recommend antiviral therapy in cases of moderate-to-severe disease, especially in the presence of central nervous system involvement. Though differences exist between recommendations in instances of isolated SNHL or SNHL in combination with only mild symptoms, the majority of experts in both groups offered at least a weak recommendation for antiviral treatment. Available results suggest antiviral treatment could therefore benefit a meaningful proportion of newborns referred for cCMV testing following failed newborn hearing screening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Screening)
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