Previous Issue
Volume 1, June
 
 

Anesth. Res., Volume 1, Issue 2 (September 2024) – 2 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
13 pages, 595 KiB  
Systematic Review
Impact of Telemedicine on Patient-Centered Outcomes in Pediatric Critical Care: A Systematic Review
by Devon M. O’Brien, Anahat K. Dhillon and Betty M. Luan-Erfe
Anesth. Res. 2024, 1(2), 54-66; https://doi.org/10.3390/anesthres1020007 - 2 Jul 2024
Viewed by 308
Abstract
Background: Pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) face shortages of intensivists, posing challenges in delivering specialized care, especially in underserved regions. While studies on telecritical care in the adult ICU have demonstrated decreased complications and mortality, research on telemedicine in the pediatric ICU setting [...] Read more.
Background: Pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) face shortages of intensivists, posing challenges in delivering specialized care, especially in underserved regions. While studies on telecritical care in the adult ICU have demonstrated decreased complications and mortality, research on telemedicine in the pediatric ICU setting remains limited. This systematic review evaluates the safety and efficacy of audiovisual telemedicine in pediatric ICUs, assessing patient-centered outcomes when compared to in-person intensivist care. Methods: Two reviewers independently assessed studies from PubMed, MEDLINE (Ovid), Global Health, and EMBASE on the pediatric population in the ICU setting that were provided care by intensivists via telemedicine. Studies without a comparison group of in-person intensivists were excluded. Selected studies were graded using the Newcastle–Ottawa scale and the Levels of Evidence Rating Scale for Therapeutic Studies. Results: Of the 2419 articles identified, 7 met the inclusion criteria. Strong evidence suggested that telemedicine increases access to intensive care. Moderate evidence demonstrated that telemedicine facilitates real-time clinical decision-making, reliable remote clinical assessments, improved ICU process measures (i.e., days on a ventilator, days on antibiotics), and decreased length of stay. Weaker evidence supported that telemedicine decreases complications and mortality. Conclusions: Telemedicine may serve as a promising solution to pediatric ICUs with limited intensivist coverage, particularly in low-resource rural and international settings. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 2777 KiB  
Article
The Composition of the L5-S1 Neural Foramen on MRI—A Retrospective Cohort Study Examining the Anatomy Relevant to Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injections
by Zachary E. Stewart, Ronald W. Mercer, Steven Staffa, F. Joseph Simeone and Ambrose J. Huang
Anesth. Res. 2024, 1(2), 44-53; https://doi.org/10.3390/anesthres1020006 - 1 Jul 2024
Viewed by 249
Abstract
Transforaminal epidural steroid injections are commonly used for the treatment of radicular pain. Some providers opt for an antero-superior approach and others a postero-inferior approach. In this retrospective cohort study, we evaluated MRI evident anatomic differences between the antero-superior and postero-inferior neural foramen [...] Read more.
Transforaminal epidural steroid injections are commonly used for the treatment of radicular pain. Some providers opt for an antero-superior approach and others a postero-inferior approach. In this retrospective cohort study, we evaluated MRI evident anatomic differences between the antero-superior and postero-inferior neural foramen at L5-S1 that may be relevant when choosing an approach for injections. A total of 29 L5-S1 neural foramina that were targeted for transforaminal epidural steroid injections were included. Pre-procedure MRIs were assessed for the distribution of the fat within the foramen. Additionally, the presence of foraminal vessels and foraminal stenosis and the presence/absence of anterolisthesis was also observed. Final imaging data were obtained by majority opinion of three or four radiologists. There was a statistically significant difference in the distribution of foraminal fat between the postero-inferior foramen and the antero-superior foramen (p < 0.001), with more fat generally in the postero-inferior foramen. Foraminal vessels were not consistently visualized. There was weak inter-reader reliability for the presence of vessels. In conclusion, this study suggests that there is a difference in the distribution of foraminal epidural fat between the postero-inferior and antero-superior foramen at L5-S1. Through MRI, vessels are inconsistently visualized and cannot be reliably detected on conventional MRI between readers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Back to TopTop