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Adolescents, Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2024) – 4 articles

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17 pages, 524 KiB  
Article
The Development and Validation of a Tool to Evaluate the Determinants of Iron-Rich Food Intake among Adolescent Girls of Senegal
by Aminata Ndene Ndiaye, Jérémie B. Dupuis, Nafissatou Ba Lo, El Hadj Momar Thiam, Mohamadou Sall and Sonia Blaney
Adolescents 2024, 4(2), 231-247; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents4020017 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 288
Abstract
To reduce anemia among adolescent girls, factors that influence the consumption of iron-rich foods/IRF have not been investigated, and neither has a tool been developed to assess its determinants. Using the extended version of the theory of planned behaviour/eTPB, this study aims to [...] Read more.
To reduce anemia among adolescent girls, factors that influence the consumption of iron-rich foods/IRF have not been investigated, and neither has a tool been developed to assess its determinants. Using the extended version of the theory of planned behaviour/eTPB, this study aims to develop and validate a questionnaire assessing individual and environmental factors that could influence IRF intake among Senegalese adolescent girls aged 10–19 years old. First, eight focus group discussions (FGDs) were held in different regions to identify salient beliefs related to each of the four constructs of the eTPB. Information from FGDs was used to develop a questionnaire that was administered to the first group (n = 200) of girls. Principal component and exploratory factorial analyses were then performed to identify latent factors for each construct. A modified version of the tool was administered to the second sample of girls (n = 400), and confirmatory factorial analyses were conducted. Hancock and Muller’s H reliability index was computed on the final model. Most metrics for fit indices were respected, and the H value was satisfactory. This study proposes a tool that could be used to explore determinants of the consumption of IRF among adolescent girls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Adolescent Health Behaviors)
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5 pages, 185 KiB  
Editorial
Exploring the Mental Health Frontier: Social Media, the Metaverse and Their Impact on Psychological Well-Being
by Ileana Di Pomponio and Luca Cerniglia
Adolescents 2024, 4(2), 226-230; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents4020016 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 411
Abstract
The emergence of social media alongside the creation of the metaverse marks two pivotal technological evolutions of our era, significantly altering the manner in which individuals engage, communicate, and understand their environment and relationships [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risky Behaviors in Social Media and Metaverse Use During Adolescence)
4 pages, 180 KiB  
Editorial
Decoding Adolescent Decision Making: Neurocognitive Processes, Risk Perception, and the Influence of Peers
by Luca Cerniglia and Ileana Di Pomponio
Adolescents 2024, 4(2), 222-225; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents4020015 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 397
Abstract
Investigating the neurocognitive mechanisms behind implicit risk assessment and decision making in adolescents is crucial for understanding the intricate array of behaviors typical of this developmental phase [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implicit Measures of Risky Behaviors in Adolescence)
22 pages, 2464 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Internet Addiction on Mental Health: Exploring the Mediating Effects of Positive Psychological Capital in University Students
by Girum Tareke Zewude, Derib Gosim Bereded, Endris Abera, Goche Tegegne, Solomon Goraw and Tesfaye Segon
Adolescents 2024, 4(2), 200-221; https://doi.org/10.3390/adolescents4020014 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1592
Abstract
Introduction: The widespread use of the internet has brought numerous benefits, but it has also raised concerns about its potential negative impact on mental health, particularly among university students. This study aims to investigate the relationship between internet addiction (IA) and mental [...] Read more.
Introduction: The widespread use of the internet has brought numerous benefits, but it has also raised concerns about its potential negative impact on mental health, particularly among university students. This study aims to investigate the relationship between internet addiction (IA) and mental health (MH) in university students, as well as explore the mediating effects of positive psychological capital (PsyCap) in this relationship. Objective: The main goal of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the measures and to determine whether internet addiction could negatively predict university students’ mental health, mediated through PsyCap. Method: A cross-sectional design with an inferential approach was employed to address this objective. The data were collected using the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ-24), Internet Addiction Scale (IAS), and Keyes’ Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF). The total sample of this study comprised 850 students from two large public higher education institutions in Ethiopia, of whom 334 (39.3%) were female and 516 (60.7%) were male, with a mean age of 22.32 (SD = 4.04). Several analyses were performed to achieve the stated objectives, such as Cronbach’s alpha and composite reliabilities, bivariate correlation, discriminant validity, common method biases, and structural equation modeling (confirmatory factor analysis, path analysis, and mediation analysis). Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to test the construct validity of IAS, PCQ-24, and MHC-SF. Additionally, the mediating model was examined using structural equation modeling with the corrected biased bootstrap method. Results: The preliminary study results found that the construct validity of IAS, PCQ-24, and MHC-SF was excellent and appropriate. Furthermore, the findings demonstrate that internet addiction had a negative and direct effect on PsyCap and MH. Moreover, PsyCap fully mediated the relationship between IA and MH. Additionally, this study confirmed that all the scales exhibited strong internal consistency and good psychometric properties. Conclusion: This study contributes to a better understanding of the complex interplay between IA, PsyCap, and MH among university students, confirming previous findings. Recommendation: The findings, discussed in relation to the recent and relevant literature, will be valuable for practitioners and researchers aiming to improve mental health and reduce internet addiction by utilizing positive psychological resources as protective factors for university students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Adolescent Health and Mental Health)
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