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Article

Alerting and Circadian Effects of Short-Wavelength vs. Long-Wavelength Narrow-Bandwidth Light during a Simulated Night Shift

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Department of Psychosocial Science, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
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Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
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Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
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Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
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Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway
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Chronobiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
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Optentia Research Focus Area, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark 1900, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Clocks & Sleep 2020, 2(4), 502-522; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2040037
Received: 3 September 2020 / Revised: 12 November 2020 / Accepted: 23 November 2020 / Published: 25 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light, Sleep and Human Health)
Light can be used to facilitate alertness, task performance and circadian adaptation during night work. Novel strategies for illumination of workplaces, using ceiling mounted LED-luminaires, allow the use of a range of different light conditions, altering intensity and spectral composition. This study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03203538) investigated the effects of short-wavelength narrow-bandwidth light (λmax = 455 nm) compared to long-wavelength narrow-bandwidth light (λmax = 625 nm), with similar photon density (~2.8 × 1014 photons/cm2/s) across light conditions, during a simulated night shift (23:00–06:45 h) when conducting cognitive performance tasks. Light conditions were administered by ceiling mounted LED-luminaires. Using a within-subjects repeated measurements study design, a total of 34 healthy young adults (27 females and 7 males; mean age = 21.6 years, SD = 2.0 years) participated. The results revealed significantly reduced sleepiness and improved task performance during the night shift with short-wavelength light compared to long-wavelength light. There was also a larger shift of the melatonin rhythm (phase delay) after working a night shift in short-wavelength light compared to long-wavelength light. Participants’ visual comfort was rated as better in the short-wavelength light than the long-wavelength light. Ceiling mounted LED-luminaires may be feasible to use in real workplaces, as these have the potential to provide light conditions that are favorable for alertness and performance among night workers. View Full-Text
Keywords: short-wavelength light; night work; sleepiness; alertness; performance; circadian rhythm short-wavelength light; night work; sleepiness; alertness; performance; circadian rhythm
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sunde, E.; Pedersen, T.; Mrdalj, J.; Thun, E.; Grønli, J.; Harris, A.; Bjorvatn, B.; Waage, S.; Skene, D.J.; Pallesen, S. Alerting and Circadian Effects of Short-Wavelength vs. Long-Wavelength Narrow-Bandwidth Light during a Simulated Night Shift. Clocks & Sleep 2020, 2, 502-522. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2040037

AMA Style

Sunde E, Pedersen T, Mrdalj J, Thun E, Grønli J, Harris A, Bjorvatn B, Waage S, Skene DJ, Pallesen S. Alerting and Circadian Effects of Short-Wavelength vs. Long-Wavelength Narrow-Bandwidth Light during a Simulated Night Shift. Clocks & Sleep. 2020; 2(4):502-522. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2040037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sunde, Erlend, Torhild Pedersen, Jelena Mrdalj, Eirunn Thun, Janne Grønli, Anette Harris, Bjørn Bjorvatn, Siri Waage, Debra J. Skene, and Ståle Pallesen. 2020. "Alerting and Circadian Effects of Short-Wavelength vs. Long-Wavelength Narrow-Bandwidth Light during a Simulated Night Shift" Clocks & Sleep 2, no. 4: 502-522. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2040037

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