Special Issue "Light, Sleep and Human Health"

A special issue of Clocks & Sleep (ISSN 2624-5175). This special issue belongs to the section "Clocks & Sleep in Human Basic Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mariana G. Figueiro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA
Interests: photobiology; circadian rhythms; light and health; non-visual effects of light
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advent of electric lighting has permitted humans to live apart from the natural, 24-hour pattern of light and dark, providing numerous social and economic benefits that have come at a cost of mounting health risks. Our “light at any time” world has opened the way for chronic disruption of the circadian system and a host of associated problems with sleep, metabolic and emotional health, and general well-being. The aim of this Special Issue is to explore the many facets of circadian disruption in the built environment and how light can be used to counter its deleterious effects.

Prof. Dr. Mariana G. Figueiro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Clocks & Sleep is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Circadian rhythms
  • Depression
  • Human factors in lighting
  • Lighting for older adults
  • Workplace lighting

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Alerting and Circadian Effects of Short-Wavelength vs. Long-Wavelength Narrow-Bandwidth Light during a Simulated Night Shift
Clocks & Sleep 2020, 2(4), 502-522; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2040037 - 25 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 989
Abstract
Light can be used to facilitate alertness, task performance and circadian adaptation during night work. Novel strategies for illumination of workplaces, using ceiling mounted LED-luminaires, allow the use of a range of different light conditions, altering intensity and spectral composition. This study (ClinicalTrials.gov [...] Read more.
Light can be used to facilitate alertness, task performance and circadian adaptation during night work. Novel strategies for illumination of workplaces, using ceiling mounted LED-luminaires, allow the use of a range of different light conditions, altering intensity and spectral composition. This study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03203538) investigated the effects of short-wavelength narrow-bandwidth light (λmax = 455 nm) compared to long-wavelength narrow-bandwidth light (λmax = 625 nm), with similar photon density (~2.8 × 1014 photons/cm2/s) across light conditions, during a simulated night shift (23:00–06:45 h) when conducting cognitive performance tasks. Light conditions were administered by ceiling mounted LED-luminaires. Using a within-subjects repeated measurements study design, a total of 34 healthy young adults (27 females and 7 males; mean age = 21.6 years, SD = 2.0 years) participated. The results revealed significantly reduced sleepiness and improved task performance during the night shift with short-wavelength light compared to long-wavelength light. There was also a larger shift of the melatonin rhythm (phase delay) after working a night shift in short-wavelength light compared to long-wavelength light. Participants’ visual comfort was rated as better in the short-wavelength light than the long-wavelength light. Ceiling mounted LED-luminaires may be feasible to use in real workplaces, as these have the potential to provide light conditions that are favorable for alertness and performance among night workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light, Sleep and Human Health)
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Article
Short Nighttime Sleep Duration and High Number of Nighttime Awakenings Explain Increases in Gestational Weight Gain and Decreases in Physical Activity but Not Energy Intake among Pregnant Women with Overweight/Obesity
Clocks & Sleep 2020, 2(4), 487-501; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2040036 - 14 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Pregnant women are at a high risk for experiencing sleep disturbances, excess energy intake, low physical activity, and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). Scant research has examined how sleep behaviors influence energy intake, physical activity, and GWG over the course of pregnancy. This [...] Read more.
Pregnant women are at a high risk for experiencing sleep disturbances, excess energy intake, low physical activity, and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). Scant research has examined how sleep behaviors influence energy intake, physical activity, and GWG over the course of pregnancy. This study conducted secondary analyses from the Healthy Mom Zone Study to examine between- and within-person effects of weekly sleep behaviors on energy intake, physical activity, and GWG in pregnant women with overweight/obesity (PW-OW/OB) participating in an adaptive intervention to manage GWG. The overall sample of N = 24 (M age = 30.6 years, SD = 3.2) had an average nighttime sleep duration of 7.2 h/night. In the total sample, there was a significant between-person effect of nighttime awakenings on physical activity; women with >1 weekly nighttime awakening expended 167.56 less physical activity kcals than women with <1 nighttime awakening. A significant within-person effect was also found for GWG such that for every increase in one weekly nighttime awakening there was a 0.76 pound increase in GWG. There was also a significant within-person effect for study group assignment; study group appeared to moderate the effect of nighttime awakenings on GWG such that for every one increase in weekly nighttime awakening, the control group gained 0.20 pounds more than the intervention group. There were no significant between- or within-person effects of sleep behaviors on energy intake. These findings illustrate an important need to consider the influence of sleep behaviors on prenatal physical activity and GWG in PW-OW/OB. Future studies may consider intervention strategies to reduce prenatal nighttime awakenings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light, Sleep and Human Health)
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Article
Can Special Light Glasses Reduce Sleepiness and Improve Sleep of Nightshift Workers? A Placebo-Controlled Explorative Field Study
Clocks & Sleep 2020, 2(2), 225-245; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep2020018 - 29 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1675
Abstract
Nightshift workers go against the natural sleep–wake rhythm. Light can shift the circadian clock but can also induce acute alertness. This placebo-controlled exploratory field study examined the effectiveness of light glasses to improve alertness while reducing the sleep complaints of hospital nurses working [...] Read more.
Nightshift workers go against the natural sleep–wake rhythm. Light can shift the circadian clock but can also induce acute alertness. This placebo-controlled exploratory field study examined the effectiveness of light glasses to improve alertness while reducing the sleep complaints of hospital nurses working nightshifts. In a crossover within-subjects design, 23 nurses participated, using treatment glasses and placebo glasses. Sleepiness and sleep parameters were measured. A linear mixed model analysis on sleepiness revealed no significant main effect of the light intervention. An interaction effect was found indicating that under the placebo condition, sleepiness was significantly higher on the first nightshift than on the last night, while under the treatment condition, sleepiness remained stable across nightshift sessions. Sleepiness during the commute home also showed a significant interaction effect, demonstrating that after the first nightshift, driver sleepiness was higher for placebo than for treatment. Subjective sleep quality showed a negative main effect of treatment vs. placebo, particularly after the first nightshift. In retrospect, both types of light glasses were self-rated as effective. The use of light glasses during the nightshift may help to reduce driver sleepiness during the commute home, which is relevant, as all participants drove home by car or (motor) bike. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light, Sleep and Human Health)
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