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Quercetin Enhances the Thioredoxin Production of Nasal Epithelial Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

1
Graduate School of Health Sciences, Showa University Graduate School, Yokohama 226-8555, Japan
2
Division of Nursing, Showa University School of Nursing and Rehabilitation Sciences, Yokohama 226-8555, Japan
3
Division of Physiology, Showa University School of Nursing and Rehabilitation Sciences, Yokohama 226-8555, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicines 2018, 5(4), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines5040124
Received: 17 October 2018 / Revised: 18 November 2018 / Accepted: 18 November 2018 / Published: 21 November 2018
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Abstract

Background: Thioredoxin (TRX) acts as both a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an immuno-modulator. Although quercetin has been shown to favorably modify allergic rhinitis (AR) symptoms, its influence on TRX production is not well defined. The present study was designed to examine whether quercetin could favorably modify AR symptoms via the TRX production of nasal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Human nasal epithelial cells (HNEpCs) were stimulated with H2O2 in the presence of quercetin. TRX levels in 24-h culture supernatants were examined with ELISA. BALB/c male mice were intraperitoneally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and intranasally challenged with OVA every other day, beginning seven days after the final sensitization. The mice were orally administered quercetin once a day for five consecutive days, beginning seven days after the final sensitization. Nasal symptoms were assessed by counting the number of sneezes and nasal rubbing behaviors during a 10-min period immediately after the challenge. TRX levels in nasal lavage fluids obtained 6 h after the challenge were examined by ELISA. Results: Treatment with 1.0 nM quercetin increased H2O2-induced TRX levels. The oral administration of 20.0 mg/kg of quercetin significantly inhibited nasal symptoms after the challenge. The same dose of quercetin significantly increased TRX levels in nasal lavage fluids. Conclusions: Quercetin’s ability to increase TRX production may account, at least in part, for its clinical efficacy toward AR. View Full-Text
Keywords: allergic rhinitis; mice; quercetin; thioredoxin; nasal epithelial cell; production; increase; in vitro; in vivo allergic rhinitis; mice; quercetin; thioredoxin; nasal epithelial cell; production; increase; in vitro; in vivo
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Edo, Y.; Otaki, A.; Asano, K. Quercetin Enhances the Thioredoxin Production of Nasal Epithelial Cells In Vitro and In Vivo. Medicines 2018, 5, 124.

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