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Open AccessArticle

Traditional Knowledge of the Utilization of Edible Insects in Nagaland, North-East India

1
Department of Zoology, Nagaland University, Lumami, Nagaland 798627, India
2
Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Nagaland University, Medziphema, Nagaland 797106, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(7), 852; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070852
Received: 2 June 2020 / Revised: 17 June 2020 / Accepted: 19 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
Located at the north-eastern part of India, Nagaland is a relatively unexplored area having had only few studies on the faunal diversity, especially concerning insects. Although the practice of entomophagy is widespread in the region, a detailed account regarding the utilization of edible insects is still lacking. The present study documents the existing knowledge of entomophagy in the region, emphasizing the currently most consumed insects in view of their marketing potential as possible future food items. Assessment was done with the help of semi-structured questionnaires, which mentioned a total of 106 insect species representing 32 families and 9 orders that were considered as health foods by the local ethnic groups. While most of the edible insects are consumed boiled, cooked, fried, roasted/toasted, some insects such as Cossus sp., larvae and pupae of ants, bees, wasps, and hornets as well as honey, bee comb, bee wax are consumed raw. Certain edible insects are either fully domesticated (e.g., Antheraea assamensis, Apis cerana indica, and Samia cynthia ricini) or semi-domesticated in their natural habitat (e.g., Vespa mandarinia, Vespa soror, Vespa tropica tropica, and Vespula orbata), and the potential of commercialization of these insects and some other species as a bio-resource in Nagaland exists. View Full-Text
Keywords: Antheraea assamensis; Apis cerana indica; entomophagy; food; honey; Nagaland; preparation; Samia cynthia ricini; Vespa mandarinia; Vespula orbata Antheraea assamensis; Apis cerana indica; entomophagy; food; honey; Nagaland; preparation; Samia cynthia ricini; Vespa mandarinia; Vespula orbata
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Mozhui, L.; Kakati, L.; Kiewhuo, P.; Changkija, S. Traditional Knowledge of the Utilization of Edible Insects in Nagaland, North-East India. Foods 2020, 9, 852.

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