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Open AccessEditorial

Constructing Invisible Walls through National and Global Policy

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Children’s HealthWatch—Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, One Boston Medical Center Place, Vose Hall 5th floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA
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Children’s HealthWatch—Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, One Boston Medical Center Place, Vose Hall 4th floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA
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Hennepin County Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, G7, 701 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2019, 6(7), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6070083
Received: 11 July 2019 / Accepted: 15 July 2019 / Published: 17 July 2019
Worldwide 37,000 people are forced to flee their homes every day due to conflict and persecution. The factors that lead people to leave their home countries often originate with economic deprivation and violence, escalated to a level that becomes a struggle for survival. Climate change, as it has accelerated over the last three to four decades and negatively impacted natural resources, contributes to a parallel increase in strife and migration. The US response to migration has been to construct an “Invisible Wall” of isolationist and xenophobic policies, many of which are especially harmful to children and their families. The southern US border is perhaps the most high profile location of the Invisible Wall’s construction, fortified by federal policies and a withdrawal from international cooperation. Global reengagement on climate change and migration, US ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and destruction of the Invisible Wall will help to create a world where children can thrive. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; migration; immigration policy; children’s rights climate change; migration; immigration policy; children’s rights
MDPI and ACS Style

Ettinger de Cuba, S.; Bovell-Ammon, A.; Becker Cutts, D. Constructing Invisible Walls through National and Global Policy. Children 2019, 6, 83.

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