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Open AccessArticle

Stimulation of Insect Herbivory by Elevated Temperature Outweighs Protection by the Jasmonate Pathway

by 1,2, 1,2,3, 1,2,3 and 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Energy-Plant Research Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
2
Plant Resilience Institute, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(2), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020172
Received: 10 December 2019 / Revised: 20 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 1 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Jasmonate Pathway: New Actors, Mechanisms and Impacts)
Rising global temperatures are associated with increases in the geographic range, population size, and feeding voracity of insect herbivores. Although it is well established that the plant hormone jasmonate (JA) promotes durable resistance to many ectothermic herbivores, little is known about how JA-mediated defense is influenced by rising temperatures. Here, we used the Arabidopsis-Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) interaction to investigate the relative contribution of JA and elevated temperature to host resistance. Video monitoring of T. ni larval behavior showed that elevated temperature greatly enhanced defoliation by increasing the bite rate and total time spent feeding, whereas loss of resistance in a JA-deficient mutant did not strongly affect these behaviors. The acceleration of insect feeding at elevated temperature was not attributed to decreases in wound-induced JA biosynthesis, expression of JA-responsive genes, or the accumulation of defensive glucosinolates prior to insect challenge. Quantitative proteomic analysis of insect frass, however, provided evidence for a temperature-dependent increase in the production of T. ni digestive enzymes. Our results demonstrate that temperature-driven stimulation of T. ni feeding outweighs the protective effects of JA-mediated resistance in Arabidopsis, thus highlighting a potential threat to plant resilience in a warming world. View Full-Text
Keywords: jasmonate; elevated temperature; climate change; Trichoplusia ni; plant-insect interaction; Arabidopsis jasmonate; elevated temperature; climate change; Trichoplusia ni; plant-insect interaction; Arabidopsis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Havko, N.E.; Kapali, G.; Das, M.R.; Howe, G.A. Stimulation of Insect Herbivory by Elevated Temperature Outweighs Protection by the Jasmonate Pathway. Plants 2020, 9, 172. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020172

AMA Style

Havko NE, Kapali G, Das MR, Howe GA. Stimulation of Insect Herbivory by Elevated Temperature Outweighs Protection by the Jasmonate Pathway. Plants. 2020; 9(2):172. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020172

Chicago/Turabian Style

Havko, Nathan E.; Kapali, George; Das, Michael R.; Howe, Gregg A. 2020. "Stimulation of Insect Herbivory by Elevated Temperature Outweighs Protection by the Jasmonate Pathway" Plants 9, no. 2: 172. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020172

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