Next Article in Journal
The Challenge for Rapid Detection of High-Structured Circular RNA: Assay of Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid Based on Recombinase Polymerase Amplification and Lateral Flow Tests
Next Article in Special Issue
Improving the Efficiency of Adventitious Shoot Induction and Somatic Embryogenesis via Modification of WUSCHEL and LEAFY COTYLEDON 1
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals Different Involvement of Proteins during Artificial Aging of Siberian Wildrye Seeds
Previous Article in Special Issue
Natural Variation in Plant Pluripotency and Regeneration
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Molecular and Biochemical Differences in Leaf Explants and the Implication for Regeneration Ability in Rorippa aquatica (Brassicaceae)

1
RIKEN BioResource Center, Ibaraki 305-0074, Japan
2
Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan
3
RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan
4
Institute of Global Innovation Research, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu 183-8506, Japan
5
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan
6
Center of Plant Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(10), 1372; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101372
Received: 26 August 2020 / Revised: 6 October 2020 / Accepted: 12 October 2020 / Published: 15 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Regeneration)
Plants have a high regeneration capacity and some plant species can regenerate clone plants, called plantlets, from detached vegetative organs. We previously outlined the molecular mechanisms underlying plantlet regeneration from Rorippa aquatica (Brassicaceae) leaf explants. However, the fundamental difference between the plant species that can and cannot regenerate plantlets from vegetative organs remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that the viability of leaf explants is a key factor affecting the regeneration capacity of R. aquatica. To test this hypothesis, the viability of R. aquatica and Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants were compared, with respect to the maintenance of photosynthetic activity, senescence, and immune response. Time-course analyses of photosynthetic activity revealed that R. aquatica leaf explants can survive longer than those of A. thaliana. Endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) were found at low levels in leaf explant of R. aquatica. Time-course transcriptome analysis of R. aquatica and A. thaliana leaf explants suggested that senescence was suppressed at the transcriptional level in R. aquatica. Application of exogenous ABA reduced the efficiency of plantlet regeneration. Overall, our results propose that in nature, plant species that can regenerate in nature can survive for a long time. View Full-Text
Keywords: leaf explant; North American Lake Cress; plantlet; phytohormones; vegetative propagation leaf explant; North American Lake Cress; plantlet; phytohormones; vegetative propagation
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Amano, R.; Momoi, R.; Omata, E.; Nakahara, T.; Kaminoyama, K.; Kojima, M.; Takebayashi, Y.; Ikematsu, S.; Okegawa, Y.; Sakamoto, T.; Kasahara, H.; Sakakibara, H.; Motohashi, K.; Kimura, S. Molecular and Biochemical Differences in Leaf Explants and the Implication for Regeneration Ability in Rorippa aquatica (Brassicaceae). Plants 2020, 9, 1372.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop