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An Exploration of the Roles of Ferric Iron Chelation-Strategy Components in the Leaves and Roots of Maize Plants

1
Botanical Institute, Cologne Biocenter, University of Cologne, D–50674 Cologne, Germany
2
Plant Physiology and Morphology Laboratory, Crop Science Department, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, Athens 11855, Greece
3
Rothamsted Research, West Common, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(5), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8050133
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 8 May 2019 / Accepted: 16 May 2019 / Published: 18 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Sulfur Research)
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Abstract

Plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms for acquiring iron from the soil. In the graminaceous species, a chelation strategy is in charge, in order to take up ferric iron from the rhizosphere. The ferric iron chelation-strategy components may also be present in the aerial plant parts. The aim of this work was to search for possible roles of those components in maize leaves. To this end, the expression patterns of ferric iron chelation-strategy components were monitored in the leaves and roots of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal sulfur-deprived maize plants, both before and after sulfate supply. The two levels of sulfur supply were chosen due to the strong impact of this nutrient on iron homeostasis, whilst mycorrhizal symbiosis was chosen as a treatment that forces the plant to optimize its photosynthetic efficiency, in order to feed the fungus. The results, in combination with the findings of our previous works, suggest a role for the aforementioned components in ferric chelation and/or unloading from the xylem vessels to the aerial plant parts. It is proposed that the gene expression of the DMA exporter ZmTOM1 can be used as an early indicator for the establishment of a mycorrhizal symbiotic relationship in maize. View Full-Text
Keywords: arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; iron deficiency; iron homeostasis; sulfur deficiency; sulfur interactions; Zea mays arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; iron deficiency; iron homeostasis; sulfur deficiency; sulfur interactions; Zea mays
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Saridis, G.; Chorianopoulou, S.N.; Ventouris, Y.E.; Sigalas, P.P.; Bouranis, D.L. An Exploration of the Roles of Ferric Iron Chelation-Strategy Components in the Leaves and Roots of Maize Plants. Plants 2019, 8, 133.

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