Next Article in Journal
Adipokines and Adipose Tissue-Related Metabolites, Nuts and Cardiovascular Disease
Previous Article in Journal
Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Quantification of 13C-Labeling in Sugars
Open AccessArticle

Testicular Caspase-3 and β-Catenin Regulators Predicted via Comparative Metabolomics and Docking Studies

1
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11865, Egypt
2
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Nahda University, Beni-Suef 62513, Egypt
3
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62513, Egypt
4
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Nahda University, Beni-Suef 62513, Egypt
5
Department of Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo 11865, Egypt
6
Department of Medical Histology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62513, Egypt
7
Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, Nahda University, Beni-Suef 62513, Egypt
8
Marine Biodiscovery Centre, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, UK
9
School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of West Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, UK
10
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Damanhur University, Elbehira 22511, Egypt
11
Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111, Australia
12
Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80402, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabi
13
King Fahd Medical Research Centre, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80402, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
14
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Minia 61519, Egypt
15
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Deraya University, Universities Zone, New Minia City 61111, Egypt
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current affiliation: Higher Colleges of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences (Veterinary Medicine), Sharjah Mens’s Campus, Sharjah 25026, UAE.
Metabolites 2020, 10(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10010031
Received: 5 December 2019 / Revised: 3 January 2020 / Accepted: 6 January 2020 / Published: 11 January 2020
Many routes have been explored to search for effective, safe, and affordable alternatives to hazardous female contraceptives. Herbal extracts and their secondary metabolites are some of the interesting research areas to address this growing issue. This study aims to investigate the effects of ten different plant extracts on testicular spermatogenesis. The correlation between the chemical profile of these extracts and their in vivo effect on male reproductive system was evaluated using various techniques. Approximately 10% of LD50 of hydro-methanolic extracts were orally administrated to rats for 60 days. Semen parameters, sexual organ weights, and serum levels of male sex hormones in addition to testes histopathology, were evaluated. Moreover, metabolomic analysis using (LC-HRESIMS), multivariate analysis (PCA), immunohistochemistry (caspase-3 and β-catenin), and a docking study were performed. Results indicated that three plant extracts significantly decreased epididymal sperm density and motility. Moreover, their effects on testicular cells were also assured by histopathological evaluations. Metabolomic profiling of the bioactive plant extracts showed the presence of diverse phytochemicals, mostly oleanane saponins, phenolic diterpenes, and lupane triterpenes. A docking study on caspase-3 enzyme showed that oleanane saponins possessed the highest binding affinity. An immunohistochemistry assay on β-catenin and caspase-3 indicated that Albizzia lebbeck was the most active extract for decreasing immunoexpression of β-catenin, while Rosmarinus officinalis showed the highest activity for increasing immunoexpression of caspase-3. The spermatogenesis decreasing the activity of A. lebbeck, Anagallis arvensis, and R. officinalis can be mediated via up-regulation of caspase-3 and down-regulation of β-catenin existing in testis cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: testicular spermatogenesis; β-catenin; caspase-3; Albizzia lebbeck; Anagallis arvensis; Rosmarinus officinalis; metabolomic profiling; docking testicular spermatogenesis; β-catenin; caspase-3; Albizzia lebbeck; Anagallis arvensis; Rosmarinus officinalis; metabolomic profiling; docking
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Hifnawy, M.S.; Aboseada, M.A.; Hassan, H.M.; AboulMagd, A.M.; Tohamy, A.F.; Abdel-Kawi, S.H.; Rateb, M.E.; El Naggar, E.M.B.; Liu, M.; Quinn, R.J.; Alhadrami, H.A.; Abdelmohsen, U.R. Testicular Caspase-3 and β-Catenin Regulators Predicted via Comparative Metabolomics and Docking Studies. Metabolites 2020, 10, 31.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop