Next Article in Journal
Effect of B Content on Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Fe-3Ti-4C Hardfacing Alloys Produced by Plasma-Transferred Arc Welding
Previous Article in Journal
Long-Term Hydrolytic Degradation of the Sizing-Rich Composite Interphase
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Understanding the Unique Role of Phospholipids in the Lubrication of Natural Joints: An Interfacial Tension Study

1
Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1K, 15-245 Bialystok, Poland
2
Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Technical Sciences, Kazimierz Wielki University, J.K. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-867 Bydgoszcz, Poland
3
Institute of Armament Technology, Faculty of Mechatronics and Aerospace, Military University of Technology, W. Urbanowicza 2, 00-908 Warsaw, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2019, 9(4), 264; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9040264
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
  |  
PDF [3735 KB, uploaded 19 April 2019]
  |     |  

Abstract

Some solid lubricants are characterized by a layered structure with weak (van der Waals) inter-interlayer forces which allow for easy, low-strength shearing. Solid lubricants in natural lubrication are characterized by phospholipid bilayers in the articular joints and phospholipid lamellar phases in synovial fluid. The influence of the acid–base properties of the phospholipid bilayer on the wettability and properties of the surface have been explained by studying the interfacial tension of spherical lipid bilayers based on a model membrane. In this paper, we show that the phospholipid multi-bilayer can act as an effective solid lubricant in every aspect, ranging from a ‘corrosion inhibitor’ in the stomach to a load-bearing lubricant in bovine joints. We present evidence of the outstanding performance of phospholipids and argue that this is due to their chemical inertness and hydrophilic–hydrophobic structure, which makes them amphoteric and provides them with the ability to form lamellar structures that can facilitate functional sliding. Moreover, the friction coefficient can significantly change for a given phospholipid bilayer so it leads to a lamellar-repulsive mechanism under highly charged conditions. After this, it is quickly transformed to result in stable low-friction conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: amphoteric articular cartilage; friction coefficient; interfacial tension; deactivation of surface-active phospholipid; β2-Glycoprotein 1 (β2-GP-1) amphoteric articular cartilage; friction coefficient; interfacial tension; deactivation of surface-active phospholipid; β2-Glycoprotein 1 (β2-GP-1)
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Petelska, A.D.; Kazimierska-Drobny, K.; Janicka, K.; Majewski, T.; Urbaniak, W. Understanding the Unique Role of Phospholipids in the Lubrication of Natural Joints: An Interfacial Tension Study. Coatings 2019, 9, 264.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Coatings EISSN 2079-6412 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top