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Biosensors, Volume 4, Issue 4 (December 2014) – 12 articles , Pages 329-522

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Article
High-Contrast Fluorescence Microscopy for a Biomolecular Analysis Based on Polarization Techniques Using an Optical Interference Mirror Slide
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 513-522; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040513 - 15 Dec 2014
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3398
Abstract
Fluorescence microscopy with an improved contrast for fluorescence images is developed using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide, which can enhance the fluorescence from a fluorophore as a result of the double interference of the excitation light and emission light. To improve the [...] Read more.
Fluorescence microscopy with an improved contrast for fluorescence images is developed using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide, which can enhance the fluorescence from a fluorophore as a result of the double interference of the excitation light and emission light. To improve the contrast of a fluorescence image using an OIM slide, a linearly-polarized excitation light was employed, and the fluorescence emission polarized perpendicular to the polarization of the excitation light was detected. The image contrast with this optical system was improved 110-fold for rhodamine B spotted on the OIM, in comparison with a glass slide using a general fluorescence microscopy optical system. Moreover, a 24-fold improvement of the image contrast was achieved for the detection of Cy3-labeled streptavidin bound to immobilize biotin. Full article
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Review
Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 494-512; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040494 - 25 Nov 2014
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3814
Abstract
Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering [...] Read more.
Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Environmental Studies)
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Review
Biosensors for the Detection of Antibiotics in Poultry Industry—A Review
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 472-493; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040472 - 21 Nov 2014
Cited by 55 | Viewed by 5780
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is emerging as a potential threat in the next decades. This is a global phenomenon whereby globalization is acting as a catalyst. Presently, the most common techniques used for the detection of antibiotics are biosensors, ELISA and liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Each [...] Read more.
Antibiotic resistance is emerging as a potential threat in the next decades. This is a global phenomenon whereby globalization is acting as a catalyst. Presently, the most common techniques used for the detection of antibiotics are biosensors, ELISA and liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Each of these techniques has its benefits as well as drawbacks. This review aims to evaluate different biosensing techniques and their working principles in order to accurately, quickly and practically detect antibiotics in chicken muscle and blood serum. The review is divided into three main sections, namely: a biosensors overview, a section on biosensor recognition and a section on biosensor transducing elements. The first segment provides a detailed overview on the different techniques available and their respective advantages and disadvantages. The second section consists of an evaluation of several analyte systems and their mechanisms. The last section of this review studies the working principles of biosensing transducing elements, focusing mainly on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology and its applications in industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Agroecosystems)
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Article
Trimetallic (Aurod-Pdshell-Ptcluster) Catalyst Used as Amperometric Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 461-471; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040461 - 19 Nov 2014
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3507
Abstract
Bimetallic nanostructured core-shell structures are commonly used as catalysts in a wide variety of reactions. We surmised that the addition of an additional metal would potentially allow catalytic tailoring with the possibility of an increase in activity. Here a tri-metallic catalytic structure, consisting [...] Read more.
Bimetallic nanostructured core-shell structures are commonly used as catalysts in a wide variety of reactions. We surmised that the addition of an additional metal would potentially allow catalytic tailoring with the possibility of an increase in activity. Here a tri-metallic catalytic structure, consisting of clustered catalytic Pt on the surface of a Pd shell supported on a rod shaped Au core was fabricated. The significance of the additional metallic component is shown by comparative electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) analysis results for the trimetallic Aurod-Pdshell-Ptcluster, bimetallic Aurod-Ptcluster and monometallic JM-Pt (used as a reference), which have respective ECSA values (cm2/mgPt) of 1883.0, 1371.7 and 879. The potential utility of the trimetallic catalysts was shown in a hydrogen peroxide sensing protocol, which showed the catalyst to have a sensitivity of 604 ìA/mMcm2 within a linear range of 0.0013–6.191 mM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
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Article
Fabrication of Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Buckypaper Electrodes for Application in Glucose Biosensors
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 449-460; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040449 - 11 Nov 2014
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 5254
Abstract
A highly sensitive glucose detection method was developed using functionalized carbon nanotube buckypaper as a free standing electrode in an electrochemical biosensor. Glucose oxidase was immobilized onto various buckypaper samples in order to oxidize glucose resulting in a measureable current/voltage signal output of [...] Read more.
A highly sensitive glucose detection method was developed using functionalized carbon nanotube buckypaper as a free standing electrode in an electrochemical biosensor. Glucose oxidase was immobilized onto various buckypaper samples in order to oxidize glucose resulting in a measureable current/voltage signal output of the biosensor. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry were utilized to determine the sensitivity of these buckypaper electrodes. Sensors of three different types of buckypaper were prepared and compared. These modified buckypaper electrode-based sensors showed much higher sensitivity to glucose compared to other electrochemical glucose sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
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Review
Microfabricated Tactile Sensors for Biomedical Applications: A Review
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 422-448; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040422 - 03 Nov 2014
Cited by 60 | Viewed by 5726
Abstract
During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present [...] Read more.
During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response). Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described. Full article
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Article
Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 403-421; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040403 - 03 Nov 2014
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4188
Abstract
Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V ( [...] Read more.
Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl). The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A “reagentless” biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10–150 µM and the detection limit of 5 µM (signal to noise ratio 3:1) of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13) for 200 µM benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
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Article
Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 387-402; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040387 - 29 Oct 2014
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3140
Abstract
Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into [...] Read more.
Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice. Full article
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Article
Carboxylated or Aminated Polyaniline—Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Nanohybrids for Immobilization of Cellobiose Dehydrogenase on Gold Electrodes
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 370-386; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040370 - 22 Oct 2014
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4768
Abstract
Polymer-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanohybrids, which differ in surface charge have been synthesized to study the bioelectrocatalysis of adsorbed cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete sordida on gold electrodes. To obtain negatively charged nanohybrids, poly(3-amino-4-methoxybenzoic acid-co-aniline) (P(AMB-A)) was covalently linked to the surface of [...] Read more.
Polymer-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanohybrids, which differ in surface charge have been synthesized to study the bioelectrocatalysis of adsorbed cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete sordida on gold electrodes. To obtain negatively charged nanohybrids, poly(3-amino-4-methoxybenzoic acid-co-aniline) (P(AMB-A)) was covalently linked to the surface of MWCNTs while modification with p-phenylenediamine (PDA) converted the COOH-groups to positively charged amino groups. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements verified the p-phenylenediamine (PDA) modification of the polymer-CNT nanohybrids. The positively charged nanohybrid MWCNT-P(AMB-A)-PDA promoted direct electron transfer (DET) of CDH to the electrode and bioelectrocatalysis of lactose was observed. Amperometric measurements gave an electrochemical response with KMapp = 8.89 mM and a current density of 410 nA/cm2 (15 mM lactose). The catalytic response was tested at pH 3.5 and 4.5. Interference by ascorbic acid was not observed. The study proves that DET between the MWCNT-P(AMB-A)-PDA nanohybrids and CDH is efficient and allows the sensorial detection of lactose. Full article
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Article
Evaluating the Equilibrium Association Constant between ArtinM Lectin and Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Impedimetric and Piezoelectric Label Free Approaches
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 358-369; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040358 - 03 Oct 2014
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4046
Abstract
Label-free methods for evaluating lectin–cell binding have been developed to determine the lectin–carbohydrate interactions in the context of cell-surface oligosaccharides. In the present study, mass loading and electrochemical transducer signals were compared to characterize the interaction between lectin and cellular membranes by measuring [...] Read more.
Label-free methods for evaluating lectin–cell binding have been developed to determine the lectin–carbohydrate interactions in the context of cell-surface oligosaccharides. In the present study, mass loading and electrochemical transducer signals were compared to characterize the interaction between lectin and cellular membranes by measuring the equilibrium association constant, , between ArtinM lectin and the carbohydrate sites of NB4 leukemia cells. By functionalizing sensor interfaces with ArtinM, it was possible to determine over a range of leukemia cell concentrations to construct analytical curves from impedimetric and/or mass-associated frequency shifts with analytical signals following a Langmuir pattern. Using the Langmuir isotherm-binding model, the obtained were (8.9 ± 1.0) × 10−5 mL/cell and (1.05 ± 0.09) × 10−6 mL/cell with the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) methods, respectively. The observed differences were attributed to the intrinsic characteristic sensitivity of each method in following Langmuir isotherm premises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Label-Free Biosensors: Exploring the Field)
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Article
Detection of the Inflammation Biomarker C-Reactive Protein in Serum Samples: Towards an Optimal Biosensor Formula
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 340-357; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040340 - 03 Oct 2014
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 5585
Abstract
The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based working [...] Read more.
The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based working electrode sensor was developed, and the types of electrode printing inks and ink curing techniques were then optimized. The electrodes with the best performance parameters were then employed for the construction of an immunosensor for CRP by immobilizing anti-human CRP antibody on the working electrode surface. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was then constructed after sample addition by using anti-human CRP antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The signal was generated by the addition of a mediator/substrate system comprised of 3,3,5',5'-Tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Measurements were conducted using chronoamperometry at −200 mV against an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A CRP limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 ng·mL1 was achieved in spiked serum samples, and performance agreement was obtained with reference to a commercial ELISA kit. The developed CRP immunosensor was able to detect a diagnostically relevant range of the biomarker in serum without the need for signal amplification using nanoparticles, paving the way for future development on a cardiac panel electrochemical point-of-care diagnostic device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
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Communication
Biosensor Applications of MAPLE Deposited Lipase
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 329-339; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios4040329 - 03 Oct 2014
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3047
Abstract
Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) is a thin film deposition technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of delicate (polymers, complex biological molecules, etc.) materials in undamaged form. The main difference of MAPLE technique with respect to PLD is [...] Read more.
Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) is a thin film deposition technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of delicate (polymers, complex biological molecules, etc.) materials in undamaged form. The main difference of MAPLE technique with respect to PLD is the target: it is a frozen solution or suspension of the (guest) molecules to be deposited in a volatile substance (matrix). Since laser beam energy is mainly absorbed by the matrix, damages to the delicate guest molecules are avoided, or at least reduced. Lipase, an enzyme catalyzing reactions borne by triglycerides, has been used in biosensors for detection of β-hydroxyacid esters and triglycerides in blood serum. Enzymes immobilization on a substrate is therefore required. In this paper we show that it is possible, using MAPLE technique, to deposit lipase on a substrate, as shown by AFM observation, preserving its conformational structure, as shown by FTIR analysis. Full article
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