Next Article in Journal
Religious Freedom in the Time of the Pandemic
Next Article in Special Issue
On the Relationship of Value Priorities with the Centrality of Religiosity and a Variety of Religious Orientations and Emotions
Previous Article in Journal
On the Path of the Prophet in Unsettled Times: Sudan’s Republican Brotherhood Looks Abroad
Previous Article in Special Issue
Centrality of Religiosity among Select LGBTQs in the Philippines
Article

Religion and Labor Market Performance: Is It What You Believe or How Much?

by 1,2,3
1
Research Programme on Religious Communities and Sustainable Development, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany
2
Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Lynnwood Rd, Hatfield, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
3
Institute for the Study of Christian Social Service (DWI), Heidelberg University, Karlstr. 16, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany
Academic Editor: Stefan Huber
Religions 2021, 12(2), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020102
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 22 January 2021 / Accepted: 28 January 2021 / Published: 3 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research with the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS))
A growing corpus of literature has explored the influence of religion on economic attitudes and behavior. The present paper investigates the effect of religion on labor market performance using a novel approach to control for the endogeneity of religion. It proposes contingency experience, individual experiences of existential insecurity, as an instrumental variable of a person’s religiosity. The empirical analysis uses data from a household survey in South Africa specifically designed for this study. The econometric approach is the estimation of instrumental variable ordered probit and linear probability models. Using the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS), the analysis differentiates between effects of individual religious intensity and of religious affiliation. The findings show that individual religiosity, measured in the CRS, has a robust and positive effect on labor market performance. Religious affiliation does not seem to affect labor market performance. The positive effect on religiosity is documented in a set of ordered and binary outcome models across different indicators of labor market performance. The study concludes that the intensity of belief exerts an influence on labor market attitudes and outcomes, while affiliation in religious communities (indicating different content of belief) does not seem to make a difference. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; religiosity; Centrality of Religiosity Scale; labor market performance; contingency experience; instrumental variables; South Africa religion; religiosity; Centrality of Religiosity Scale; labor market performance; contingency experience; instrumental variables; South Africa
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Öhlmann, P. Religion and Labor Market Performance: Is It What You Believe or How Much? Religions 2021, 12, 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020102

AMA Style

Öhlmann P. Religion and Labor Market Performance: Is It What You Believe or How Much? Religions. 2021; 12(2):102. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020102

Chicago/Turabian Style

Öhlmann, Philipp. 2021. "Religion and Labor Market Performance: Is It What You Believe or How Much?" Religions 12, no. 2: 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020102

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop