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Open AccessArticle

Why Uptake of Blended Internet-Based Interventions for Depression Is Challenging: A Qualitative Study on Therapists’ Perspectives

1
Department of Research and Innovation, GGZ inGeest, Specialized Mental Health Care, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Clinical Psychology Section, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Telepsychiatry and E-Mental Health, Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(1), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010091
Received: 23 November 2019 / Revised: 10 December 2019 / Accepted: 20 December 2019 / Published: 30 December 2019
(1) Background: Blended cognitive behavioral therapy (bCBT; online and face-to-face sessions) seems a promising alternative alongside regular face-to-face CBT depression treatment in specialized mental health care organizations. Therapists are key in the uptake of bCBT. This study focuses on therapists’ perspectives on usability, satisfaction, and factors that promote or hinder the use of bCBT in routine practice; (2) Methods: Three focus groups (n = 8, n = 7, n = 6) and semi-structured in-depth interviews (n = 15) were held throughout the Netherlands. Beforehand, the participating therapists (n = 36) completed online questionnaires on usability and satisfaction. Interviews were analyzed by thematic analysis; (3) Results: Therapists found the usability sufficient and were generally satisfied with providing bCBT. The thematic analysis showed three main themes on promoting and hindering factors: (1) therapists’ needs regarding bCBT uptake, (2) therapists’ role in motivating patients for bCBT, and (3) therapists’ experiences with bCBT; (4) Conclusions: Overall, therapists were positive; bCBT can be offered by all CBT-trained therapists and future higher uptake is expected. Especially the pre-set structure of bCBT was found beneficial for both therapists and patients. Nevertheless, therapists did not experience promised time-savings—rather, the opposite. Besides, there are still teething problems and therapeutic shortcomings that need improvement in order to motivate therapists to use bCBT. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive behavioral therapy; blended treatment; depressive disorder; implementation; therapists’ perspective; routine care cognitive behavioral therapy; blended treatment; depressive disorder; implementation; therapists’ perspective; routine care
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Mol, M.; van Genugten, C.; Dozeman, E.; van Schaik, D.J.F.; Draisma, S.; Riper, H.; Smit, J.H. Why Uptake of Blended Internet-Based Interventions for Depression Is Challenging: A Qualitative Study on Therapists’ Perspectives. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 91.

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