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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Quantitative Feedback via High-Fidelity Airway Management Training on Success Rate in Endotracheal Intubation in Undergraduate Medical Students—A Prospective Single-Center Study

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Leipzig Medical Center, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Interdisciplinary Intensive Care Medicine, District of Mittweida Hospital gGmbH, 09648 Mittweida, Germany
3
LernKlinik Leipzig—Skills and Simulation Center, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(9), 1465; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091465
Received: 31 July 2019 / Revised: 2 September 2019 / Accepted: 11 September 2019 / Published: 14 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Anesthesiology)
Endotracheal intubation is still the gold standard in airway management. For medical students and young professionals, it is often difficult to train personal skills. We tested a high-fidelity simulator with an additional quantitative feedback integration to elucidate if competence acquisition for airway management is increased by using this feedback method. In the prospective trial, all participants (n = 299; 4th-year medical students) were randomized into two groups—One had been trained on the simulator with additional quantitative feedback (n = 149) and one without (n = 150). Three simulator measurements were considered as quality criteria—The pressure on the upper front row of teeth, the correct pressure point of the laryngoscope spatula and the correct depth for the fixation of the tube. There were a total of three measurement time points—One after initial training (with additional capture of cognitive load), one during the exam, and a final during the follow-up, approximately 20 weeks after the initial training. Regarding the three quality criteria, there was only one significant difference, with an advantage for the control group with respect to the correct pressure point of the laryngoscope spatula at the time of the follow-up (p = 0.011). After the training session, the cognitive load was significantly higher in the intervention group (p = 0.008) and increased in both groups over time. The additional quantitative feedback of the airway management trainer brings no measurable advantage in training for endotracheal intubation. Due to the increased cognitive load during the training, simple airway management task training may be more efficient for the primary acquisition of essential procedural steps. View Full-Text
Keywords: airway management; medical education; simulation; cognitive load; medical students; endotracheal intubation airway management; medical education; simulation; cognitive load; medical students; endotracheal intubation
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Hempel, G.; Heinke, W.; Struck, M.F.; Piegeler, T.; Rotzoll, D. Impact of Quantitative Feedback via High-Fidelity Airway Management Training on Success Rate in Endotracheal Intubation in Undergraduate Medical Students—A Prospective Single-Center Study. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1465.

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