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Open AccessArticle

Maternal Obesity and Offspring Long-Term Infectious Morbidity

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel
2
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel
3
Department of Neonatology, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to the article.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(9), 1466; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091466
Received: 6 August 2019 / Revised: 6 September 2019 / Accepted: 9 September 2019 / Published: 14 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Obstetrics & Gynecology)
Obesity is a leading cause of morbidity world-wide. Maternal obesity is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. Furthermore, Obesity has been associated with increased susceptibility to infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term pediatric infectious morbidity of children born to obese mothers. This population-based cohort analysis compared deliveries of obese (maternal pre-pregnancy BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and non-obese patients at a single tertiary medical center. Hospitalizations of the offspring up to the age of 18 years involving infectious morbidities were evaluated according to a predefined set of ICD-9 codes. A Kaplan–Meier survival curve was used to compare cumulative hospitalization incidence between the groups and Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for possible confounders. 249,840 deliveries were included. Of them, 3399 were children of obese mothers. Hospitalizations involving infectious morbidity were significantly more common in children born to obese mothers compared with non-obese patients (12.5% vs. 11.0%, p < 0.01). The Kaplan–Meier survival curve demonstrated a significantly higher cumulative incidence of infectious-related hospitalizations in the obese group (log rank p = 0.03). Using the Cox regression model, maternal obesity was found to be an independent risk factor for long-term infectious morbidity of the offspring (adjusted HR = 1.125, 95% CI 1.021–1.238, p = 0.017). View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; obesity; infections; long term; pediatric hospitalization pregnancy; obesity; infections; long term; pediatric hospitalization
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Gutvirtz, G.; Wainstock, T.; Landau, D.; Sheiner, E. Maternal Obesity and Offspring Long-Term Infectious Morbidity. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1466.

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