Next Article in Journal
The Retrobulbar Spot Sign and Prominent Middle Limiting Membrane as Prognostic Markers in Non-Arteritic Retinal Artery Occlusion
Next Article in Special Issue
Multifocal Orthokeratology versus Conventional Orthokeratology for Myopia Control: A Paired-Eye Study
Previous Article in Journal
Femoral Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed through the Interval of the Direct Anterior Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
Comparison of Methods for Estimating Retinal Shape: Peripheral Refraction vs. Optical Coherence Tomography
Article

The Role of Back Optic Zone Diameter in Myopia Control with Orthokeratology Lenses

1
Centre Marsden de Terapia Visual, Consulta 156, Centro Medico Teknon, Vilana 12, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
2
Intitute Visual Clinic Center, Pereira 660002, Colombia
3
Clinical and Experimental Optometry Research Lab (CEORLab), Center of Physics, School of Science, University of Minho, Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(2), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020336
Received: 12 December 2020 / Revised: 8 January 2021 / Accepted: 14 January 2021 / Published: 18 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection New Frontiers in Myopia Progression in Children)
We compared the efficacy of controlling the annual increase in axial length (AL) in myopic Caucasian children based on two parameters: the back optic zone diameter (BOZD) of the orthokeratology (OK) lens and plus power ring diameter (PPRD) or mid-peripheral annular ring of corneal steepening. Data from 71 myopic patients (mean age, 13.34 ± 1.38 years; range, 10–15 years; 64% male) corrected with different BOZD OK lenses (DRL, Precilens) were collected retrospectively from a Spanish optometric clinic. The sample was divided into groups with BOZDs above or below 5.00 mm and the induced PPRD above or below 4.5 mm, and the relation to AL and refractive progression at 12 months was analyzed. Three subgroups were analyzed, i.e., plus power ring (PPR) inside, outside, or matching the pupil. The mean baseline myopia was −3.11 ± 1.46 D and the AL 24.65 ± 0.88 mm. Significant (p < 0.001) differences were found after 12 months of treatment in the refractive error and AL for the BOZD and PPRD. AL changes in subjects with smaller BOZDs decreased significantly regarding larger diameters (0.09 ± 0.12 and 0.15 ± 0.11 mm, respectively); in subjects with a horizontal sector of PPRD falling inside the pupil, the AL increased less (p = 0.035) than matching or outside the pupil groups by 0.04 ± 0.10 mm, 0.10 ± 0.11 mm, and 0.17 ± 0.12 mm, respectively. This means a 76% lesser AL growth or 0.13 mm/year in absolute reduction. OK corneal parameters can be modified by changing the OK lens designs, which affects myopia progression and AL elongation. Smaller BOZD induces a reduced PPRDs that slows AL elongation better than standard OK lenses. Further investigations should elucidate the effect of pupillary diameter, PPRD, and power change on myopia control. View Full-Text
Keywords: orthokeratology; myopia progression; optic zone diameter; pupillary diameter; axial length orthokeratology; myopia progression; optic zone diameter; pupillary diameter; axial length
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Pauné, J.; Fonts, S.; Rodríguez, L.; Queirós, A. The Role of Back Optic Zone Diameter in Myopia Control with Orthokeratology Lenses. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 336. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020336

AMA Style

Pauné J, Fonts S, Rodríguez L, Queirós A. The Role of Back Optic Zone Diameter in Myopia Control with Orthokeratology Lenses. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(2):336. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020336

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pauné, Jaume, Silvia Fonts, Lina Rodríguez, and Antonio Queirós. 2021. "The Role of Back Optic Zone Diameter in Myopia Control with Orthokeratology Lenses" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 2: 336. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020336

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop