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Review

HDL Proteome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Evidence of a Link

1
Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2
Unit of Neurosciences, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy
3
Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, 43124 Parma, Italy
4
Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(12), 1224; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121224
Received: 23 October 2020 / Revised: 25 November 2020 / Accepted: 30 November 2020 / Published: 3 December 2020
Several lines of epidemiological evidence link increased levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) with lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This observed relationship might reflect the beneficial effects of HDL on the cardiovascular system, likely due to the implication of vascular dysregulation in AD development. The atheroprotective properties of this lipoprotein are mostly due to its proteome. In particular, apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I, E, and J and the antioxidant accessory protein paraoxonase 1 (PON1), are the main determinants of the biological function of HDL. Intriguingly, these HDL constituent proteins are also present in the brain, either from in situ expression, or derived from the periphery. Growing preclinical evidence suggests that these HDL proteins may prevent the aberrant changes in the brain that characterize AD pathogenesis. In the present review, we summarize and critically examine the current state of knowledge on the role of these atheroprotective HDL-associated proteins in AD pathogenesis and physiopathology. View Full-Text
Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease; inflammation; vascular dementia; high-density lipoprotein; accessory proteins; apolipoprotein A-I; apolipoprotein E; apolipoprotein J; paraoxonase 1 Alzheimer’s disease; inflammation; vascular dementia; high-density lipoprotein; accessory proteins; apolipoprotein A-I; apolipoprotein E; apolipoprotein J; paraoxonase 1
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marsillach, J.; Adorni, M.P.; Zimetti, F.; Papotti, B.; Zuliani, G.; Cervellati, C. HDL Proteome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Evidence of a Link. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 1224. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121224

AMA Style

Marsillach J, Adorni MP, Zimetti F, Papotti B, Zuliani G, Cervellati C. HDL Proteome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Evidence of a Link. Antioxidants. 2020; 9(12):1224. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121224

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marsillach, Judit, Maria P. Adorni, Francesca Zimetti, Bianca Papotti, Giovanni Zuliani, and Carlo Cervellati. 2020. "HDL Proteome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Evidence of a Link" Antioxidants 9, no. 12: 1224. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121224

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