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Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Autonomic Function

1
School of Medicine, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
2
Division of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, 1247 Webber Hall, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tipu Aziz and Alex Green
Brain Sci. 2016, 6(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci6030033
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 10 August 2016 / Accepted: 10 August 2016 / Published: 16 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Applications)
Over the course of the development of deep brain stimulation (DBS) into a well-established therapy for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia, its utility as a potential treatment for autonomic dysfunction has emerged. Dysfunction of autonomic processes is common in neurological diseases. Depending on the specific target in the brain, DBS has been shown to raise or lower blood pressure, normalize the baroreflex, to alter the caliber of bronchioles, and eliminate hyperhidrosis, all through modulation of the sympathetic nervous system. It has also been shown to improve cortical control of the bladder, directly induce or inhibit the micturition reflex, and to improve deglutition and gastric emptying. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the relevant available studies describing these effects of DBS on autonomic function, which vary greatly in character and magnitude with respect to stimulation target. View Full-Text
Keywords: deep brain stimulation; autonomic dysfunction; subthalamic nucleus; periaqueductal or periventricular gray; globus pallidus interna; thalamus; blood pressure; sweating; micturition; gastrointestinal motility deep brain stimulation; autonomic dysfunction; subthalamic nucleus; periaqueductal or periventricular gray; globus pallidus interna; thalamus; blood pressure; sweating; micturition; gastrointestinal motility
MDPI and ACS Style

Basiago, A.; Binder, D.K. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Autonomic Function. Brain Sci. 2016, 6, 33.

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