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Open AccessArticle

Audiohaptic Feedback Enhances Motor Performance in a Low-Fidelity Simulated Drilling Task

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Faculty of Health Sciences, Ontario Tech University, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, Canada
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Faculty of Business and Information Technology, Ontario Tech University, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, Canada
3
Durham College, School of Health and Community Services, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10010021
Received: 26 November 2019 / Revised: 27 December 2019 / Accepted: 29 December 2019 / Published: 31 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Body in Brain Plasticity)
When used in educational settings, simulations utilizing virtual reality (VR) technologies can reduce training costs while providing a safe and effective learning environment. Tasks can be easily modified to maximize learning objectives of different levels of trainees (e.g., novice, intermediate, expert), and can be repeated for the development of psychomotor skills. VR offers a multisensory experience, providing visual, auditory, and haptic sensations with varying levels of fidelity. While simulating visual and auditory stimuli is relatively easy and cost-effective, similar representations of haptic sensation still require further development. Evidence suggests that mixing high- and low-fidelity realistic sensations (e.g., audition and haptic) can improve the overall perception of realism, however, whether this also leads to improved performance has not been examined. The current study examined whether audiohaptic stimuli presented in a virtual drilling task can lead to improved motor performance and subjective realism, compared to auditory stimuli alone. Right-handed participants (n = 16) completed 100 drilling trials of each stimulus type. Performance measures indicated that participants overshot the target during auditory trials, and undershot the target during audiohaptic trials. Undershooting is thought to be indicative of improved performance, optimizing both time and energy requirements. View Full-Text
Keywords: simulation; audiohaptic; multisensory perception; motor control; body representation simulation; audiohaptic; multisensory perception; motor control; body representation
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Grant, B.L.; Yielder, P.C.; Patrick, T.A.; Kapralos, B.; Williams-Bell, M.; Murphy, B.A. Audiohaptic Feedback Enhances Motor Performance in a Low-Fidelity Simulated Drilling Task. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 21.

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