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Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(6), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9061070

Research Progress on Conducting Polymer-Based Biomedical Applications

1
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
2
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, Sejong 30016, Korea
3
Department of Polymer Engineering, Graduate School, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea
4
School of Polymer Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea
5
Alan G. MacDiarmid Energy Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 10 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Trends in Polymer Nanoscience and Nanotechnology)
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Abstract

Conducting polymers (CPs) have attracted significant attention in a variety of research fields, particularly in biomedical engineering, because of the ease in controlling their morphology, their high chemical and environmental stability, and their biocompatibility, as well as their unique optical and electrical properties. In particular, the electrical properties of CPs can be simply tuned over the full range from insulator to metal via a doping process, such as chemical, electrochemical, charge injection, and photo-doping. Over the past few decades, remarkable progress has been made in biomedical research including biosensors, tissue engineering, artificial muscles, and drug delivery, as CPs have been utilized as a key component in these fields. In this article, we review CPs from the perspective of biomedical engineering. Specifically, representative biomedical applications of CPs are briefly summarized: biosensors, tissue engineering, artificial muscles, and drug delivery. The motivation for use of and the main function of CPs in these fields above are discussed. Finally, we highlight the technical and scientific challenges regarding electrical conductivity, biodegradability, hydrophilicity, and the loading capacity of biomolecules that are faced by CPs for future work. This is followed by several strategies to overcome these drawbacks. View Full-Text
Keywords: conducting polymers; biomedical engineering; biosensors; tissue engineering; artificial muscles; drug delivery conducting polymers; biomedical engineering; biosensors; tissue engineering; artificial muscles; drug delivery
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Park, Y.; Jung, J.; Chang, M. Research Progress on Conducting Polymer-Based Biomedical Applications. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1070.

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