Next Article in Journal
Numerical Investigation into Effects of Viscous Flux Vectors on Hydrofoil Cavitation Flow and Its Radiated Flow Noise
Next Article in Special Issue
Thermal Characteristics of Plastic Film Tension in Roll-to-Roll Gravure Printed Electronics
Previous Article in Journal
Study of Standing-Wave Thermoacoustic Electricity Generators for Low-Power Applications
Previous Article in Special Issue
Formation and Characterization of Inkjet-Printed Nanosilver Lines on Plasma-Treated Glass Substrates
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8020288

Inkjet-Printed and Paper-Based Electrochemical Sensors

1
School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2
Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 January 2018 / Revised: 11 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 14 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electronics 2017)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2249 KB, uploaded 14 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

It is becoming increasingly more important to provide a low-cost point-of-care diagnostic device with the ability to detect and monitor various biological and chemical compounds. Traditional laboratories can be time-consuming and very costly. Through the combination of well-established materials and fabrication methods, it is possible to produce devices that meet the needs of many patients, healthcare and medical professionals, and environmental specialists. Existing research has demonstrated that inkjet-printed and paper-based electrochemical sensors are suitable for this application due to advantages provided by the carefully selected materials and fabrication method. Inkjet printing provides a low cost fabrication method with incredible control over the material deposition process, while paper-based substrates enable pump-free microfluidic devices due to their natural wicking ability. Furthermore, electrochemical sensing is incredibly selective and provides accurate and repeatable quantitative results without expensive measurement equipment. By merging each of these favorable techniques and materials and continuing to innovate, the production of low-cost point-of-care sensors is certainly within reach. View Full-Text
Keywords: electrochemical sensor; inkjet printing; paper; carbon nanomaterials; flexible electronics electrochemical sensor; inkjet printing; paper; carbon nanomaterials; flexible electronics
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Tortorich, R.P.; Shamkhalichenar, H.; Choi, J.-W. Inkjet-Printed and Paper-Based Electrochemical Sensors. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 288.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Appl. Sci. EISSN 2076-3417 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top