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Article

Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius Reduces Symptoms of Denture Stomatitis and Oral Colonization by Candida albicans

1
Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
2
Azienda Sanitaria Locale di Novara, Viale Roma, 7-28100 Novara, Italy
3
Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Sciences, ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, Via Caserta, 6-00161 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 3002; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093002
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 22 April 2020 / Accepted: 23 April 2020 / Published: 25 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Sciences in Oral Pathology)
Denture stomatitis (DS) is an inflammatory status of oral mucosae frequently observed in denture wearers, and mainly associated with oral overgrowth of Candida albicans. DS is the cause of multiple visits to the dental office and is thought to enhance the risk of systemic infections. The treatment of DS mainly relies upon improvement of oral hygiene measures and prescription of topical or systemic antifungal agents, and disinfectants that, although effective, are not without drawbacks. Since, in recent years, some probiotics were investigated as a means to contrast oral colonization by Candida spp., this study was designed to preliminarily evaluate the effects of probiotic strain Streptococcus salivarius K12, in subjects affected by DS, and the duration of these effects. Fifty adult denture wearers affected by DS were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: the experimental group was instructed to perform careful oral and denture hygiene and to assume the probiotic preparation for 30 days; the control group received only oral hygiene instructions. Patients were evaluated for signs of DS at the beginning of the study, at the end of treatment and 30 days later. Microbiological samples were obtained at the beginning of the study and at the end of treatment to quantify Candida albicans cells. Experimental treatment reduced clinical signs and symptoms of DS and the count of C. albicans. The clinical effects of experimental treatment were still evident after 30 days, suggesting that administration of probiotic strain Streptococcus salivarius K12 could be a promising approach in the treatment of DS. View Full-Text
Keywords: denture stomatitis; Candida albicans; probiotic; Streptococcus salivarius denture stomatitis; Candida albicans; probiotic; Streptococcus salivarius
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MDPI and ACS Style

Passariello, C.; Di Nardo, F.; Polimeni, A.; Di Nardo, D.; Testarelli, L. Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius Reduces Symptoms of Denture Stomatitis and Oral Colonization by Candida albicans. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 3002. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093002

AMA Style

Passariello C, Di Nardo F, Polimeni A, Di Nardo D, Testarelli L. Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius Reduces Symptoms of Denture Stomatitis and Oral Colonization by Candida albicans. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(9):3002. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093002

Chicago/Turabian Style

Passariello, Claudio, Francesco Di Nardo, Antonella Polimeni, Dario Di Nardo, and Luca Testarelli. 2020. "Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius Reduces Symptoms of Denture Stomatitis and Oral Colonization by Candida albicans" Applied Sciences 10, no. 9: 3002. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093002

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