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Reply published on 9 November 2018, see Animals 2018, 8(11), 202.

Letter of Animals 2018, 8(9), 143.

Open AccessLetter
Animals 2018, 8(10), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani8100179

Letter to the Editor Re: Kipperman, B.S. and German, A.J. Animals 2018, 8, 143

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Public Health, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
Received: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 October 2018 / Published: 16 October 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [161 KB, uploaded 16 October 2018]

Abstract

A recent opinion paper by Kipperman and German (2018) discussed the increasing prevalence of pet obesity, the risk factors contributing to this increase, and the role of veterinarians in helping manage pet obesity. They described the problem as a One Health problem as it has been previously characterized. Kipperman and German also reported a sample of medical records from their referring veterinarians wherein a surprisingly small number of veterinarians recorded information about pets’ body weight or discussions with owners about pet obesity. From their sample, they concluded that general practice veterinarians are not meeting their professional and ethical obligations to recognize and address pet obesity. This letter discusses reasons why veterinarians may not be adequately addressing the pet obesity problem. A similar situation exists in human medicine. Numerous studies in the human field have revealed some of the reasons many physicians do not address obesity with their patients. As it is likely that veterinarians have similar reasons for avoiding the obesity issue, obstacles identified by physicians in encountering overweight obesity are reviewed in this letter. View Full-Text
Keywords: companion animal; obesity; overweight; One Health; human–animal bond; medical record companion animal; obesity; overweight; One Health; human–animal bond; medical record
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Watson, K.M. Letter to the Editor Re: Kipperman, B.S. and German, A.J. Animals 2018, 8, 143. Animals 2018, 8, 179.

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