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The Goat as a Risk Factor for Parasitic Infections in Ovine Flocks

INVESAGA Group, Departamento de Patoloxía Animal, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Avda. Carballo Calero s/n, 27002 Lugo, Spain
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Animals 2021, 11(7), 2077; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11072077
Received: 7 June 2021 / Revised: 8 July 2021 / Accepted: 9 July 2021 / Published: 12 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Small Ruminants)
Small ruminants in northwestern Spain are frequently managed in mixed flocks. Sheep-goat joint management has not been considered a risk factor for parasite infection, so the main objective of this study was to establish if mixed management with goats supposes a risk factor for parasitic infections in ovine flocks. Goat contact was a risk factor for sheep to be infected by protostrongylids, Dictyocaulus filaria, gastrointestinal nematodes and Eimeria spp. In relation to host-specific parasites, goats cannot be considered as a source for sheep, but competition for food and spaces between both small ungulates can suppose a reduced grazing area to sheep, provoking high environmental contamination and stress that facilitate their infection.
Small ruminants in northwestern Spain are frequently managed in mixed flocks. Sheep–goat joint management has not been considered a risk factor for parasite infection, so the main objective of this study was to establish if mixed management with goats supposes a risk factor for parasitic infections in ovine flocks. Two thousand and ninety-three sheep were sampled from 74 commercial meat ovine flocks for diagnostic of the main parasites. Goat contact was a risk factor for sheep to be infected by protostrongylids, Dictyocaulus filaria, gastrointestinal nematodes and Eimeria spp. In contrast, Moniezia, Fasciola hepatica, Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Paramphistomidae prevalences were not influenced. Sheep–goat mixed management can be considered as a risk factor, since goats would act as a source of pasture contamination for interspecific parasites (protostrongylids, Dictyocaulus filaria and gastrointestinal nematodes). In relation to host-specific parasites, such as Eimeria spp., goats cannot be considered as a source for sheep, but competition for food and spaces between both small ungulates can suppose a reduced grazing area to sheep, provoking high environmental contamination and stress that facilitate their infection. Future epidemiological studies for parasitic infections in small ruminants should consider sheep–goat mixed management as a possible risk factor to be included in multivariate analyses. View Full-Text
Keywords: sheep; goat; mixed management; risk factor; parasitic infection sheep; goat; mixed management; risk factor; parasitic infection
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MDPI and ACS Style

García-Dios, D.; Panadero, R.; Díaz, P.; Viña, M.; Remesar, S.; Prieto, A.; López-Lorenzo, G.; Martínez-Calabuig, N.; Díez-Baños, P.; Morrondo, P.; López, C.M. The Goat as a Risk Factor for Parasitic Infections in Ovine Flocks. Animals 2021, 11, 2077. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11072077

AMA Style

García-Dios D, Panadero R, Díaz P, Viña M, Remesar S, Prieto A, López-Lorenzo G, Martínez-Calabuig N, Díez-Baños P, Morrondo P, López CM. The Goat as a Risk Factor for Parasitic Infections in Ovine Flocks. Animals. 2021; 11(7):2077. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11072077

Chicago/Turabian Style

García-Dios, David, Rosario Panadero, Pablo Díaz, Miguel Viña, Susana Remesar, Alberto Prieto, Gonzalo López-Lorenzo, Néstor Martínez-Calabuig, Pablo Díez-Baños, Patrocinio Morrondo, and Ceferino M. López. 2021. "The Goat as a Risk Factor for Parasitic Infections in Ovine Flocks" Animals 11, no. 7: 2077. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11072077

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