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Article

Seasonal Patterns of Dominant Microbes Involved in Central Nutrient Cycles in the Subsurface

1
Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research GmbH—UFZ, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
2
Department of Molecular Biogeochemistry, Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, Germany
3
Department of Soil Science, Friedrich Schiller University, 07743 Jena, Germany
4
German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
5
Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biosciences, Pharmacy and Psychology, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(11), 1694; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111694
Received: 30 September 2020 / Revised: 23 October 2020 / Accepted: 29 October 2020 / Published: 30 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Microbiology)
Microbial communities play a key role for central biogeochemical cycles in the subsurface. Little is known about whether short-term seasonal drought and rewetting events influence the dominant microbes involved in C- and N-cycles. Here, we applied metaproteomics at different subsurface sites in winter, summer and autumn from surface litter layer, seepage water at increasing subsoil depths and remote located groundwater from two wells within the Hainich Critical Zone Exploratory, Germany. We observed changes in the dominance of microbial families at subsurface sampling sites with increasing distances, i.e., Microcoleaceae dominated in topsoil seepage, while Candidatus Brocadiaceae dominated at deeper and more distant groundwater wells. Nitrifying bacteria showed a shift in dominance from drought to rewetting events from summer by Nitrosomandaceae to autumn by Candidatus Brocadiaceae. We further observed that the reductive pentose phosphate pathway was a prominent CO2-fixation strategy, dominated by Woeseiaceae in wet early winter, which decreased under drought conditions and changed to a dominance of Sphingobacteriaceae under rewetting conditions. This study shows that increasing subsurface sites and rewetting event after drought alter the dominances of key subsurface microbes. This helps to predict the consequences of annual seasonal dynamics on the nutrient cycling microbes that contribute to ecosystem functioning. View Full-Text
Keywords: metaproteomics; microbial communities; subsurface; nutrient cycles; critical zone metaproteomics; microbial communities; subsurface; nutrient cycles; critical zone
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lohmann, P.; Benk, S.; Gleixner, G.; Potthast, K.; Michalzik, B.; Jehmlich, N.; Bergen, M.v. Seasonal Patterns of Dominant Microbes Involved in Central Nutrient Cycles in the Subsurface. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1694. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111694

AMA Style

Lohmann P, Benk S, Gleixner G, Potthast K, Michalzik B, Jehmlich N, Bergen Mv. Seasonal Patterns of Dominant Microbes Involved in Central Nutrient Cycles in the Subsurface. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(11):1694. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111694

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lohmann, Patrick, Simon Benk, Gerd Gleixner, Karin Potthast, Beate Michalzik, Nico Jehmlich, and Martin v. Bergen 2020. "Seasonal Patterns of Dominant Microbes Involved in Central Nutrient Cycles in the Subsurface" Microorganisms 8, no. 11: 1694. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111694

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