Next Article in Journal
The Form of N Supply Determines Plant Growth Promotion by P-Solubilizing Microorganisms in Maize
Previous Article in Journal
The Purple Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Demonstrates a Compartmentalization of Gut Bacterial Microbiota, Predictive Functional Attributes, and Taxonomic Co-Occurrence
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020037

Fungal Endophyte Communities of Three Agricultural Important Grass Species Differ in Their Response Towards Management Regimes

1
Genomic and Applied Microbiology and Göttingen Genomics Laboratory, Institute of Microbiology and Genetics, Georg-August University of Göttingen, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany
2
Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
3
Division of Agricultural Entomology, Department of Crop Sciences, Georg-August University of Göttingen, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2019 / Accepted: 23 January 2019 / Published: 27 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Microbiology)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2551 KB, uploaded 30 January 2019]   |  

Abstract

Despite the importance of endophytic fungi for plant health, it remains unclear how these fungi are influenced by grassland management practices. Here, we investigated the effect of fertilizer application and mowing frequency on fungal endophyte communities and their life strategies in aerial tissues of three agriculturally important grass species (Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L. and Lolium perenne L.) over two consecutive years. Our results showed that the management practices influenced fungal communities in the plant holobiont, but observed effects differed between grass species and sampling year. Phylogenetic diversity of fungal endophytes in D. glomerata was significantly affected by mowing frequency in 2010, whereas fertilizer application and the interaction of fertilization with mowing frequency had a significant impact on community composition of L. perenne in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Taken together, our research provides a basis for future studies on responses of fungal endophytes towards management practices. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study simultaneously assessing fungal endophyte communities in aerial parts of three agriculturally important grass species over two consecutive years. View Full-Text
Keywords: Fungal endophytes; associated fungi; grassland management; putative fungal life strategies; high-throughput sequencing; agriculturally important grass species; fertilization; mowing frequency Fungal endophytes; associated fungi; grassland management; putative fungal life strategies; high-throughput sequencing; agriculturally important grass species; fertilization; mowing frequency
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wemheuer, B.; Thomas, T.; Wemheuer, F. Fungal Endophyte Communities of Three Agricultural Important Grass Species Differ in Their Response Towards Management Regimes. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 37.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Microorganisms EISSN 2076-2607 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top