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Open AccessReview

Animal Models for Gammaherpesvirus Infections: Recent Development in the Analysis of Virus-Induced Pathogenesis

1
Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan
2
Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo 173-8610, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(2), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9020116
Received: 28 January 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 11 February 2020 / Published: 12 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative Animal Models of Human Viral Infections)
Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is involved in the pathogenesis of various lymphomas and carcinomas, whereas Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) participates in the pathogenesis of endothelial sarcoma and lymphomas. EBV and KSHV are responsible for 120,000 and 44,000 annual new cases of cancer, respectively. Despite this clinical importance, no chemotherapies or vaccines have been developed for virus-specific treatment and prevention of these viruses. Humans are the only natural host for both EBV and KSHV, and only a limited species of laboratory animals are susceptible to their experimental infection; this strict host tropism has hampered the development of their animal models and thereby impeded the study of therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. To overcome this difficulty, three main approaches have been used to develop animal models for human gammaherpesvirus infections. The first is experimental infection of laboratory animals with EBV or KSHV. New-world non-human primates (NHPs) and rabbits have been mainly used in this approach. The second is experimental infection of laboratory animals with their own inherent gammaherpesviruses. NHPs and mice have been mainly used here. The third, a recent trend, employs experimental infection of EBV or KSHV or both to immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human immune system components (humanized mice). This review will discuss how these three approaches have been used to reproduce human clinical conditions associated with gammaherpesviruses and to analyze the mechanisms of their pathogenesis.
Keywords: Epstein–Barr virus; Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus; gammaherpesvirus; animal model; humanized mouse; non-human primates; rabbits; lymphoproliferative disease; lymphoma Epstein–Barr virus; Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus; gammaherpesvirus; animal model; humanized mouse; non-human primates; rabbits; lymphoproliferative disease; lymphoma
MDPI and ACS Style

Fujiwara, S.; Nakamura, H. Animal Models for Gammaherpesvirus Infections: Recent Development in the Analysis of Virus-Induced Pathogenesis. Pathogens 2020, 9, 116.

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