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Exile, Pistols, and Promised Lands: Ibsen and Israeli Modernist Writers

Discipline of English, School of English and Creative Arts, National University of Ireland Galway, H91 TK33 Galway, Ireland
Humanities 2019, 8(3), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8030151
Received: 2 August 2019 / Accepted: 12 September 2019 / Published: 17 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nordic and European Modernisms)
Allusions to Henrik Ibsen’s plays in the works of two prominent Israeli modernist writers, Amos Oz’s autobiographical A Tale of Love and Darkness (2004) and David Grossman’s The Zigzag Kid (1994) examined in the context of the Israeli reception of Ibsen in the 1950s and 1960s. To establish the variety of meanings Ibsen’s plays had for the audiences of the Habimah production of Peer Gynt in 1952 and The Kameri production of Hedda Gabler in 1966, this article draws on newspaper reviews and actors’ memoirs, as well as providing an analysis of Leah Goldberg’s translation of Peer Gynt. It emerges that both authors enlisted Ibsen in their exploration of the myths surrounding the formation of Israeli nationhood and identity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ibsen; Henrik; Oz; Amos; Grossman; David; Goldberg; Leah; modernism; Israel; Israeli literature; Peer Gynt; Hedda Gabler; translation; adaptation; Zionism Ibsen; Henrik; Oz; Amos; Grossman; David; Goldberg; Leah; modernism; Israel; Israeli literature; Peer Gynt; Hedda Gabler; translation; adaptation; Zionism
MDPI and ACS Style

Ruppo, I. Exile, Pistols, and Promised Lands: Ibsen and Israeli Modernist Writers. Humanities 2019, 8, 151.

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