Special Issue "Nordic and European Modernisms"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jakob Lothe

Department of Literature, Area Studies and European Languages, P.O. Box 1003 Blindern, University of Oslo, NO-0315 OSLO, Norway
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will explore the growth and development of Nordic modernisms in a European context. Modernism is a truly international movement that cuts across many boundaries—geographical, cultural, and linguistic. Modernism involves the literatures of several countries, including the Nordic countries; cross-fertilization is a prerequisite for its very existence. Moreover, the diverse forms of modernism that emerged in the Nordic countries at widely differing moments are not limited to literature, but also include other art forms such as the visual arts and film. Concentrating on and yet not limiting itself to the study of literary texts, the Special Issue will demonstrate that the emergence of modernism in the Nordic countries is closely linked to, and inspired by, the modernizing works in early twentieth-century Europe. Presenting Nordic art as multi-dimensional and dynamic, it will also show that, while responding to a growing influence of internationalization, Nordic modernism itself contributed to international trends. Starting from the premise that significant aspects of art and aesthetics complicate an understanding of “the Nordic” as a concept that is either “self-evident” or “important”, the Special Issue aims to provide a venue for sharing, elaborating and refining our understanding of the Nordic in relation to European modernism. Seen in this light, literary studies as practiced in this Special Issue will include discussions of literary translation in the cultural and historical context of the Nordic countries, investigating the interdependence of and interrelationships between translation, literature, literary history and literary culture. A further premise is that although the focus of the issue is on individual works and authors, we also need to pay attention to “translation” as an inevitable element in forms of writing and art. This includes not only the presence of the “foreign” in original writing but also the transnational element in any discussion of foreign literature and culture. The use of the plural form “modernisms” invites contributors to adopt an understanding of modernism that, while recognizing the importance of the modernist movement between circa 1890 and 1940, is sufficiently elastic to include various forms of extension and continuation of Nordic modernisms in the post-war period.

Prof. Dr. Jakob Lothe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • modernisms
  • Nordic
  • European
  • cross-fertilization
  • literature
  • translation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Montage Rhetoric of Nordahl Grieg’s Interwar Drama
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040099
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 10 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 15 October 2018
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Abstract
This essay explains the modernist montage rhetoric of Nordahl Grieg’s 1935 drama Vår ære og vår makt in the context of the playwright’s interest in Soviet theater and his Communist sympathies. After considering the historical background for the play’s depiction of war profiteers
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This essay explains the modernist montage rhetoric of Nordahl Grieg’s 1935 drama Vår ære og vår makt in the context of the playwright’s interest in Soviet theater and his Communist sympathies. After considering the historical background for the play’s depiction of war profiteers in Bergen, Norway, during the First World War, the article analyzes Grieg’s use of a montage rhetoric consisting of grotesque juxtapositions and abrupt scenic shifts. Attention is also given to the play’s use of incongruous musical styles and its revolutionary political message. In the second part, the article discusses Grieg’s writings on Soviet theater from the mid-1930s. Grieg embraced innovative aspects of Soviet theater at a time when the greatest period of experimentation in post-revolutionary theater was already ending, and Socialist Realism was being imposed. The article briefly discusses Grieg’s controversial pro-Stalinist, anti-fascist position, before concluding that Vår ære og vår makt represents an important instance of Norwegian appropriation of international modernist and avant-garde theater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nordic and European Modernisms)
Open AccessArticle In the Traces of Modernism: William Faulkner in Swedish Criticism 1932–1950
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040096
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 30 September 2018 / Published: 4 October 2018
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Abstract
This article focusses the reception of William Faulkner in Sweden from the first introduction in 1932 until the Nobel Prize announcement in 1950. Through reviews, introductory articles, book chapters, forewords, and translations, the critical evaluation of Faulkner’s particular brand of modernism is traced
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This article focusses the reception of William Faulkner in Sweden from the first introduction in 1932 until the Nobel Prize announcement in 1950. Through reviews, introductory articles, book chapters, forewords, and translations, the critical evaluation of Faulkner’s particular brand of modernism is traced and analysed. The analysis takes theoretical support from Hans Robert Jauss’ notion of ‘horizon of expectations’, Gérard Genette’s concept of ‘paratext’, and E.D. Hirsh’s distinction between ‘meaning’ and ‘significance’. To pinpoint the biographical and psychologizing tendency in Swedish criticism, Roland Barthes’s notion of ‘biographeme’ is introduced. The analysis furthermore shows that the critical discussion of Faulkner’s modernism could be ordered along an axis where the basic parameters are form and content, aesthetics and ideology, narrator and author, and writer and reader. The problematics adhering to these fundamental aspects are more or less relevant for the modernist novel in general. Thus, it could be argued that the reception of Faulkner in Sweden and Swedish Faulkner criticism epitomize and highlight the fundamental features pertaining to the notion of ‘modernism’, both with regard to its formal and content-based characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nordic and European Modernisms)
Open AccessArticle Nordic Modernism for Beginners
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040090
Received: 16 July 2018 / Revised: 13 September 2018 / Accepted: 18 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
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Abstract
This essay proposes a narrative of the Nordic countries’ relationship to modernism and other major literary trends of the late 19th and 20th centuries, that situates them in conjunction with the rest of Europe. “Masterpieces of Scandinavian Literature: the 20th Century” is a
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This essay proposes a narrative of the Nordic countries’ relationship to modernism and other major literary trends of the late 19th and 20th centuries, that situates them in conjunction with the rest of Europe. “Masterpieces of Scandinavian Literature: the 20th Century” is a course that has been taught to American college students without expertise in literature or Scandinavia for three decades. This article describes the content and methodologies of the course and how Nordic modernisms are explained to this particular audience of beginners. Simple definitions of modernism and other related literary movements are provided. By focusing on this unified literary historical narrative and highlighting the pioneers of Scandinavian literature, the Nordic countries are presented as solid participants in European literary and cultural history. Further, the social realism of the Modern Breakthrough emerges as one of the Nordic countries distinct contributions to world literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nordic and European Modernisms)
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