Next Article in Journal
Influence of Industry 4.0 on the Production and Service Sectors in Pakistan: Evidence from Textile and Logistics Industries
Previous Article in Journal
Female Genital Mutilation in Nigeria: A Persisting Challenge for Women’s Rights
Previous Article in Special Issue
Balancing Gender and Power: How Disney’s Hercules Fails to Go the Distance
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(12), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120245

The Rise of the Androgynous Princess: Examining Representations of Gender in Prince and Princess Characters of Disney Movies Released 2009–2016

1
Department of Psychology, University of West London, St Mary’s Road, London W5 5RF, UK
2
School of Health and Education, Middlesex University Dubai, Knowledge Park, Block 16, Dubai, UAE
3
Department of Nursing, Middle Tennessee University, 13-1 E Main Street, Murfreesboro, TN 37132, USA
4
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
5
Master’s Counseling Department, Messiah College, One College Avenue, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 16 November 2018 / Published: 22 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psychosocial Implications of Disney Movies)
Full-Text   |   PDF [397 KB, uploaded 29 November 2018]

Abstract

Previous quantitative research examining Disney movies has highlighted that whilst prince characters display largely balanced gender profiles, princesses exhibit biased gender role portrayals—performing mostly feminine characteristics, rarely participating in rescue behavior, and concluding movies in romantic relationships with the prince. However, such research, as well as public commentary, has also suggested that princess characters in movies released across the 2000s and 2010s may have more positive gender role portrayals. This study aimed to test these assertions by utilizing content coding analysis to examine the behavioral characteristics, rescue behavior, and romantic conclusions of prince and princess characters in five iconic Disney films released between 2009 and 2016 (The Princess and the Frog, Tangled, Brave (released under Pixar), Frozen, and Moana). Comparisons were also made with earlier titles to assess historical changes. Results showed that princesses in “2000s to 2010s” movies exhibited an almost equal number of masculine and feminine behaviors, thus demonstrating more egalitarian profiles over time. In contrast, princes appeared to adopt a more feminine behavioral profile in later movies. In addition, characters engaged in equal numbers of rescue behaviors, and princesses were more likely to remain single in “2000s to 2010s” movies. Results therefore suggest that Disney is indeed presenting more diverse, androgynous, balanced characters to viewers, and the theoretical and practical implications for the socialization of young child viewers are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: Disney; princess; prince; gender roles; content coding analysis; children’s media Disney; princess; prince; gender roles; content coding analysis; children’s media
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hine, B.; England, D.; Lopreore, K.; Skora Horgan, E.; Hartwell, L. The Rise of the Androgynous Princess: Examining Representations of Gender in Prince and Princess Characters of Disney Movies Released 2009–2016. Soc. Sci. 2018, 7, 245.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top