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Open AccessArticle

Machine Bodies: Performing Abstraction and Brazilian Art

Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
Received: 7 October 2019 / Revised: 11 December 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2020 / Published: 19 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dance and Abstraction)
In 1973, Analívia Cordeiro produced the videodance M3x3. Filmed in a Brazilian television studio and choreographed by Cordeiro with a computer, the work explores the limits of the human body through abstraction and its inhabitation of a new media landscape. Tracing the genealogy of M3x3 to the history of videodance, German and Brazilian art, and Brazilian politics, the article spotlights the media central for its conceptualization, production, and circulation to argue for how the video theorizes the posthuman as the inextricable entanglement of the body and technology. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brazilian art; videodance; computer art; Analívia Cordeiro; modern dance; abstract art; posthumanism Brazilian art; videodance; computer art; Analívia Cordeiro; modern dance; abstract art; posthumanism
MDPI and ACS Style

Alvarez, M.V. Machine Bodies: Performing Abstraction and Brazilian Art. Arts 2020, 9, 11.

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