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Open AccessArticle

The American Flag and the Alaska Native Brotherhood

Department of Art & Art History, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Arts 2019, 8(4), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8040158
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 4 November 2019 / Accepted: 9 November 2019 / Published: 2 December 2019
The Alaska Native Brotherhood (ANB) (est. 1912) is one of the oldest Indigenous rights groups in the United States. Although critics have accused the ANB of endorsing assimilationist policies in its early years, recent scholarship has re-evaluated the strategies of the ANB to advance Tlingit and Haida governance at the same time that they pursued a strategic commitment to the settler state. Contributing to this re-appraisal of the early ANB, this article examines photographic documentation of the use of the American flag in ANB Halls from the period 1914–1945. I argue that the pairing of the American flag with Indigenous imagery in ANB Halls communicated the ANB’s commitment to U.S. citizenship and to Tlingit and Haida sovereignty. View Full-Text
Keywords: Alaska Native Brotherhood; Alaska Native Sisterhood; American flag; Indigenous sovereignty; patriotic pluralism; Tlingit; Haida; Tsimshian Alaska Native Brotherhood; Alaska Native Sisterhood; American flag; Indigenous sovereignty; patriotic pluralism; Tlingit; Haida; Tsimshian
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Moore, E.L. The American Flag and the Alaska Native Brotherhood. Arts 2019, 8, 158.

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