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Open AccessArticle

An In Vitro Corrosion Study of Open Cell Iron Structures with PEG Coating for Bone Replacement Applications

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Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University in Košice, Moyzesova 11, SK-04154 Košice, Slovakia
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Department of Mechanochemistry, Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 45, SK-04001 Košice, Slovakia
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Department of Electrical and Electronic Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-61200 Brno, Czech Republic
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Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA
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Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, SK-04001 Košice, Slovakia
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Clinic of Ruminants, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy in Košice, Komenskeho 73, SK-04181 Košice, Slovakia
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1st Department of Surgery, P. J. Šafárik University, Trieda SNP 1, SK-040 11 Košice, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2018, 8(7), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8070499
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 15 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
Iron-based substrates with polyethylene glycol coating were prepared as possible materials for biodegradable orthopedic implants. Biodegradable materials that provide mechanical support of the diseased tissue at the time of implanting and then disappear gradually during the healing process are sometimes favored instead of permanent implants. The implant degradation rate should match the time of the tissue regrowth. In this work, the degradation behavior of iron-based foams was studied electrochemically during immersion tests in Hanks’ solution. The corrosion rate of the polyethylene glycol-coated samples increased and the corrosion potential shifted to more negative values. This indicates an enhanced degradation rate as compared to the uncoated material, fulfilling the goal of being able to tune the degradation rate. It is the interfacial interaction between the hydrophilic polymer layer and the iron surface that is responsible for the enhanced oxidation rate of iron. View Full-Text
Keywords: degradable biomaterials; corrosion; implants; iron; polymer coating layer; polyethylene glycol degradable biomaterials; corrosion; implants; iron; polymer coating layer; polyethylene glycol
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haverová, L.; Oriňaková, R.; Oriňak, A.; Gorejová, R.; Baláž, M.; Vanýsek, P.; Kupková, M.; Hrubovčáková, M.; Mudroň, P.; Radoňák, J.; Orságová Králová, Z.; Morovská Turoňová, A. An In Vitro Corrosion Study of Open Cell Iron Structures with PEG Coating for Bone Replacement Applications. Metals 2018, 8, 499. https://doi.org/10.3390/met8070499

AMA Style

Haverová L, Oriňaková R, Oriňak A, Gorejová R, Baláž M, Vanýsek P, Kupková M, Hrubovčáková M, Mudroň P, Radoňák J, Orságová Králová Z, Morovská Turoňová A. An In Vitro Corrosion Study of Open Cell Iron Structures with PEG Coating for Bone Replacement Applications. Metals. 2018; 8(7):499. https://doi.org/10.3390/met8070499

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haverová, Lucia; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Gorejová, Radka; Baláž, Matej; Vanýsek, Petr; Kupková, Miriam; Hrubovčáková, Monika; Mudroň, Pavol; Radoňák, Jozef; Orságová Králová, Zuzana; Morovská Turoňová, Andrea. 2018. "An In Vitro Corrosion Study of Open Cell Iron Structures with PEG Coating for Bone Replacement Applications" Metals 8, no. 7: 499. https://doi.org/10.3390/met8070499

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