Next Article in Journal
Field Trapping Bactrocera latifrons (Diptera: Tephritidae) with Select Eugenol Analogs That Have Been Found to Attract Other ‘Non-Responsive’ Fruit Fly Species
Previous Article in Journal
Mating Behavior of Rosalia batesi (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Is Mediated by Male-Produced Sex Pheromones
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cross-Resistance: A Consequence of Bi-partite Host-Parasite Coevolution
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Spore Acquisition and Survival of Ambrosia Beetles Associated with the Laurel Wilt Pathogen in Avocados after Exposure to Entomopathogenic Fungi

1
Indian River Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, 2199 South Rock Road, Ft. Pierce, FL 34945, USA
2
Escuela Agrícola Panamericana, P.O. Box 93 Tegucigalpa, Honduras
3
Tropical Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2018, 9(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9020049
Received: 1 March 2018 / Revised: 3 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parasite-Insect Interactions)
Laurel wilt is a disease threatening the avocado industry in Florida. The causative agent of the disease is a fungus vectored by ambrosia beetles that bore into the trees. Until recently, management strategies for the vectors of the laurel wilt fungus relied solely on chemical control and sanitation practices. Beneficial entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are the most common and prevalent natural enemies of pathogen vectors. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that commercial strains of EPF can increase the mortality of the primary vector, Xyleborus glabratus, and potential alternative vectors, Xylosandrus crassiusculus, Xyleborus volvulus and Xyleborus bispinatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Our study provides baseline data for three formulated commercially-available entomopathogenic fungi used as potential biocontrol agents against X. crassiusculus, X. volvulus and X. bispinatus. The specific objectives were to determine: (1) the mean number of viable spores acquired per beetle species adult after being exposed to formulated fungal products containing different strains of EPF (Isaria fumosorosea, Metarhizium brunneum and Beauveria bassiana); and (2) the median and mean survival times using paper disk bioassays. Prior to being used in experiments, all fungal suspensions were adjusted to 2.4 × 106 viable spores/mL. The number of spores acquired by X. crassiusculus was significantly higher after exposure to B. bassiana, compared to the other fungal treatments. For X. volvulus, the numbers of spores acquired per beetle were significantly different amongst the different fungal treatments, and the sequence of spore acquisition rates on X. volvulus from highest to lowest was I. fumosorosea > M. brunneum > B. bassiana. After X. bispinatus beetles were exposed to the different suspensions, the rates of acquisition of spores per beetle amongst the different fungal treatments were similar. Survival estimates (data pooled across two tests) indicated an impact for each entomopathogenic fungus per beetle species after exposure to a filter paper disk treated at the same fungal suspension concentration. Kaplan–Meier analysis (censored at day 7) revealed that each beetle species survived significantly shorter in bioassays containing disks treated with EPF compared to water only. This study demonstrated that ambrosia beetles associated with the laurel wilt pathogen in avocados are susceptible to infection by EPF under laboratory conditions. However, the EPF needs to be tested under field conditions to confirm their efficacy against the beetles. View Full-Text
Keywords: ambrosia beetles; laurel wilt; avocados; entomopathogenic fungi; Kaplan–Meier analysis ambrosia beetles; laurel wilt; avocados; entomopathogenic fungi; Kaplan–Meier analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Avery, P.B.; Bojorque, V.; Gámez, C.; Duncan, R.E.; Carrillo, D.; Cave, R.D. Spore Acquisition and Survival of Ambrosia Beetles Associated with the Laurel Wilt Pathogen in Avocados after Exposure to Entomopathogenic Fungi. Insects 2018, 9, 49.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop I did now initially check that there shouldn't be