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Article

Modeling the Invasion of the Large Hive Beetle, Oplostomusfuligineus, into North Africa and South Europe under a Changing Climate

1
Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Damanhour University, Damanhour 22516, Egypt
2
Entomology Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566, Egypt
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Department of Botany, Hindu College Moradabad, MJP Rohilkhand University Bareilly, Bareilly 244001, India
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Department of Botany & Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh P.O. Box 2455, Saudi Arabia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alberto Satta and Panagiotis Theodorou
Insects 2021, 12(4), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040275
Received: 21 February 2021 / Revised: 18 March 2021 / Accepted: 19 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Honeybees and Wild Bees Health)
Large Hive Beetles (LHBs) are common pests of honeybee colonies, especially in the African continent. The ability of this pest to invade new regions in North Africa and Europe is highlighted in the present study using a species distribution modeling technique in current and future climate change scenarios in 2050 and 2070. In brief, this pest will be a new burden on the beekeeping sector outside Africa, and therefore the development of early monitoring strategies is recommended.
Some beetle species can attack honeybee colonies, causing severe damage to beekeeping. These pests include Oplostomus fuligineus, which is also known as the Large Hive Beetle (LHB). This beetle is native to Sub-Saharan Africa and has recently also been recorded in some parts of North Africa. It feeds mainly on young bee larvae and stored food within the colonies, causing severe damage to weak colonies. The present work sheds light on the current and future distribution (from 2050 to 2070) of this beetle in Africa and South Europe using species distribution modeling. Maxent was used to model the invasion of LHB. The Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs) 126 and 585 were used to model the future distribution of LHB. The Maxent models showed satisfactory results with a high Area Under Curve (AUC) value (0.85 ± 0.02). Furthermore, the True Skill Statistics (TSS) value was equal to 0.87. The current and future maps showed a high risk of invasion because of temperature variation in most of the parts of North Africa and South Europe. The maps also predicted the future invasion of LHB into other countries, mainly through southern Europe. These predictive risk maps will help quarantine authorities in highly relevant countries to prevent the expansion of this pest outside of its natural range. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; invasion; pest; beekeeping; maxent; LHB climate change; invasion; pest; beekeeping; maxent; LHB
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abou-Shaara, H.; Alashaal, S.A.; Hosni, E.M.; Nasser, M.G.; Ansari, M.J.; Alharbi, S.A. Modeling the Invasion of the Large Hive Beetle, Oplostomusfuligineus, into North Africa and South Europe under a Changing Climate. Insects 2021, 12, 275. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040275

AMA Style

Abou-Shaara H, Alashaal SA, Hosni EM, Nasser MG, Ansari MJ, Alharbi SA. Modeling the Invasion of the Large Hive Beetle, Oplostomusfuligineus, into North Africa and South Europe under a Changing Climate. Insects. 2021; 12(4):275. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040275

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abou-Shaara, Hossam, Sara A. Alashaal, Eslam M. Hosni, Mohamed G. Nasser, Mohammad J. Ansari, and Sulaiman A. Alharbi 2021. "Modeling the Invasion of the Large Hive Beetle, Oplostomusfuligineus, into North Africa and South Europe under a Changing Climate" Insects 12, no. 4: 275. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040275

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